OR 

Project Management for Humans

A note from the editors: We‘re pleased to share an excerpt from Chapter 6 of Brett Harned‘s new book, Project Management for Humans, available now from Rosenfeld Media.I loved the game Tetris as a kid. I played the Game Boy version for hours. It‘s easy to get wrapped up in the concept of little shapes coming together in a logical way to clear a goal. The pieces complement one another, yet they all naturally work in different way

favicon of http://alistapart.com

Considering Open Source Licenses

So you have a project that you want to use open source tools to create-well, I tip my hat off to you as a developer. But do you know the questions you need to answer before you get started? What stage of development is your project in right now? Have you finished the planning phase? Are you going to work with a team? Will the project be split up into different modules? And so on. The principle of DRY (Don‘t Repeat Yourself) has become an

favicon of http://alistapart.com

Coding with Clarity

Working code isn‘t necessarily good code. Your code also needs to be easy to read, understand, and modify. It needs clarity, and to achieve that, it has to be organized well, with careful planning and proper separation of ideas taking place before you even open your code editor. Coding for clarity is something that separates the great developers from the merely good, and there are a few basic principles that can set you on that path. Note:

favicon of http://alistapart.com

Ten Extras for Great API Documentation

If you manage to create amazing API documentation and ensure that developers have a positive experience implementing your API, they will sing the praises of your product. Continuously improving your API documentation is an investment, but it can have a huge impact. Great documentation builds trust, differentiates you from your competition, and provides marketing value. I‘ve shared some best practices for creating good API documentation in

favicon of http://alistapart.com

A List Apart volunteer update

A note from the editors: A few days ago, we announced a reimagined A List Apart, with you, our faithful readers of nearly 20 years, contributing your talents. The response from this community was humbling, thrilling, and, frankly, a bit overwhelming. If you volunteered to help A List Apart and haven‘t heard back from us yet, here‘s what‘s up.To the many wonderful souls who have so far volunteered to help A List Apart, thank you

favicon of http://alistapart.com

The Ten Essentials for Good API Documentation

API documentation is the number one reference for anyone implementing your API, and it can profoundly influence the developer experience. Because it describes what services an application programming interface offers and how to use those services, your documentation will inevitably create an impression about your product-for better or for worse. In this two-part series I share what I‘ve learned about API documentation. This part discusse

favicon of http://alistapart.com

The Story of CSS Grid, from Its Creators

A note from the editors: We want to thank the Microsoft Edge team for sharing transcripts of the interviews they conducted with many of the brilliant people who have contributed to the development of CSS Grid. Those transcripts proved invaluable in compiling this history. You can watch the short video they produced from those interviews, Creating CSS Grid, on Channel 9.On October 17th, Microsoft‘s Edge browser shipped its implementation of

favicon of http://alistapart.com

Web Typography: Designing Tables to be Read, Not Looked At

A note from the editors: We‘re pleased to share an excerpt from Chapter 2 of Richard Rutter‘s new book, Web Typography.Good designers spend a great deal of time sweating over typography. They agonise over typefaces, iterate through type scales and meticulously apply white space, all in the service of the reader. Then comes along a table with the temptation to get creative, and all thoughts of the reader go out of the window. And yet t

favicon of http://alistapart.com

The Right Way to Select Technology, An Excerpt

A note from the editors: We‘re pleased to share an excerpt from Chapter 4 of Tony Byrne and Jarrod Gingras‘s new book, The Right Way to Select Technology, available now from Rosenfeld Media.After establishing a solid business case, enterprises will typically turn to assembling the oft-dreaded ‘requirements document‘-or more accurately, a set of documents, spreadsheets, and diagrams that compose a multiheaded requirements p

favicon of http://alistapart.com

The New CSS Layout, An Excerpt

A note from the editors: We‘re pleased to share an excerpt from Chapter 3 (‘The New Layout‘) of Rachel Andrew‘s new book, The New CSS Layout, available now from A Book Apart.As we have seen, flexbox wasn‘t designed for grid layouts-but this is where our newest specification is most at home. CSS Grid Layout does exactly what its name suggests: it enables the creation of grid layouts in CSS. This is two-dimensional lay

favicon of http://alistapart.com

Be a Mentor

Looking back over my eleven-year career in the web industry, I owe most of my success to two people from early on: Holly and Rebecca. Both were supervisors; but, more importantly, both were mentors. I wouldn‘t be where I am today without their mentorship. Three years into my career, I got a promotion and became a supervisor myself. It was so exciting to be in a position to mentor others and give back to the community! I only had one questio

favicon of http://alistapart.com

Web Typography: Numerals

A note from the editors: We‘re pleased to share an excerpt from Chapter 2 of Richard Rutter‘s new book, Web Typography.When it comes to numbers we have just ten digits. Throw in a comma and a period and we‘ve got grand total of twelve characters. You might not think that would present much of a challenge to a typographer, but to a professional typesetter (that‘s you if you‘re a designer) numerals require far more nua

favicon of http://alistapart.com

What I Talk About When I Talk About Sorting: Untangling Array#sort

Sorting things is a fundamental part of our daily lives-it‘s something we do everyday to make our lives easier, following all kinds of criteria. Whether you‘re looking for a person‘s phone number, the location of your favorite book, or even matching up your socks, sorting allows us to find what we are looking for in a faster and more effective way. This is also the case in the world of web development. But if you thought you k

favicon of http://alistapart.com

UX for Lizard Brains

Technology can make magic happen. In seconds, you can find all the blue sandals in a warehouse of millions of shoes. A million people can read the same article without killing one tree. You can undo, unsend, and even unfriend! But here‘s the buzzkill: if unanticipated or unwelcome, the magic of technology is confusing, disorienting, and unintuitive-a UX designer‘s worst nightmare. So how can we ensure that the magic we create is int

favicon of http://alistapart.com

Planning for Accessibility

A note from the editors: We‘re pleased to share an excerpt from Chapter 3 (‘Planning for Accessibility") of Laura Kalbag‘s new book, Accessibility for Everyone, available now from A Book Apart.Incorporating accessibility from the beginning is almost always easier, more effective, and less expensive than making accessibility improvements as a separate project. In fact, building accessibility into your project and processes has a

favicon of http://alistapart.com

Feedback That Gives Focus

I have harbored a lifelong dislike of feedback. I didn‘t like it in sixth grade when a kid on the bus told me my brand new sneakers were ‘too bright.‘ And I didn‘t like it when a senior executive heard my pitch for a digital project and said, ‘I hate this idea.‘ Turns out my sneakers were pretty bright, and my pitch wasn‘t the best idea. Still, those experiences and many others like them didn‘t help

favicon of http://alistapart.com

How People Perceive Lossy Image Quality: A Study

The notion that lossy image quality is subjective is not an unreasonable hypothesis. There are many factors that play into how humans perceive quality: screen size, image scaling, and yes, even performance. Many research projects have tackled this subject, but I‘ve recently launched a survey that attempts to understand how people perceive image quality in a slightly different way: in the context of performance. This image quality assessme

favicon of http://alistapart.com

Using Webfonts

A note from the editors: We‘re pleased to share an excerpt from Chapter 2 (‘Using Webfonts") of Bram Stein‘s new book, Webfont Handbook, available now from A Book Apart.Now that you‘ve selected a font, let‘s put it on your website. Webfonts are defined in CSS through the @font-face rule. If you‘re a web developer, you‘ve most likely written, copied and pasted, or at the very least seen an @font-face rule.

favicon of http://alistapart.com

What the Failure of New Coke Can Teach Us About User Research And Design

In the late 1970s, Pepsi was running behind Coca-Cola in the competition to be the leading cola. But then Pepsi discovered that in blind taste tests, people actually preferred the sweeter taste of Pepsi. To spread the word, Pepsi ran a famous advertising campaign, called the Pepsi Challenge, which showed people tasting the two brands of cola while not knowing which was which. They chose Pepsi every time. As Pepsi steadily gained market share in

favicon of http://alistapart.com