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Level Up Your JavaScript Error Monitoring

(This is a sponsored post.) Automatically detect and diagnose JavaScript errors impacting your users with Bugsnag without changing your code or adding try/catch blocks. Get comprehensive diagnostic reports, know immediately which errors are worth fixing, and debug in a fraction of the time compared to traditional tools. Bugsnag detects every single error and prioritizes errors with the greatest impact on your users. Get support for 50+ platforms

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Radial Gradient Recipes

Radial gradients are pretty dang cool. It‘s amazing we can paint the background of an element with them so easily. Easily is a relative term though. It‘s certainly easier than needing to create a graphic in third-party software to use as the background, and the syntax is highly learnable. But it‘s also not that easy to remember if you don‘t use it often, and it‘s more complicated than linear-gradient(). I figured I&

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Understanding React `setState`

React components can, and often do, have state. State can be anything, but think of things like whether a user is logged in or not and displaying the correct username based on which account is active. Or an array of blog posts. Or if a modal is open or not and which tab within it is active. React components with state render UI based on that state. When the state of components changes, so does the component UI. The post Understanding React `setS

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Kinsta

(This is a sponsored post.) Huge thanks to Kinsta for sponsoring CSS-Tricks this week! We‘re big fans of WordPress around here, and know some of you out there are too. So this might come of interest: Kinsta is WordPress hosting that runs on Google Cloud Platform. And in fact, it‘s officially recommended by Google Cloud for fully-managed WordPress hosting. What does that matter? Well, when you go with a cloud host you‘re entering

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Scroll to the Future

This is an interesting read on the current state of scrollbars and how to control their behavior across operating systems and browsers. The post also highlights a bunch of stuff I didn‘t know about, like Element.scrollIntoView() and the scroll-behavior CSS property. My favorite part of all though? It has to be this bit: In the modern web, relying heavily on custom JavaScript to achieve identical behavior for all clients is no longer justifi

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What are Higher-Order Components in React?

If you have been in the React ecosystem for a while, there is a possibility that you have heard about Higher Order Components. Let‘s look at a simple implementation while also trying to explain the core idea. From here you should get a good idea of how they work and even put them to use. Why Higher-Order Components? As you build React applications, you will run into situations where you want to share the same functionality across multiple

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Grid to Flex

Una Kravets shows how to make layouts in CSS Grid with flexbox fallbacks for browsers that don‘t support those grid properties just yet. Una writes: CSS grid is AMAZING! However, if you need to support users of IE11 and below, or Edge 15 and below, grid won‘t really work as you expect...This site is a solution for you so you can start to progressively enhance without fear! The site is a provides examples using common layouts and compo

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JAMstack Comments

JAMstack sites are often seen as being static. A more accurate mental model for them would be that they are sites which have the ability to be hosted statically. The difference might seem semantic, but thanks to the rise of many tools and services which simplify running a build and deploying to static hosting infrastructure, such sites can feel much fresher and dynamic than you might imagine, while still capable of being served from static hostin

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Server-Side Visualization With Nightmare

This is an extract from chapter 11 of Ashley Davis‘s book Data Wrangling with JavaScript now available on the Manning Early Access Program. I absolutely love this idea as there is so much data visualization stuff on the web that relies on fully functioning client side JavaScript and potentially more API calls. It‘s not nearly as robust, accessible, or syndicatable as it could be. If you bring that data visualization back to the server

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Creating a Panning Effect for SVG

Earlier this month on the Animation at Work Slack, we had a discussion about finding a way to let users pan inside an SVG. I made this demo below to show how I‘d approach this question: See the Pen Demo - SVG Panning by Louis Hoebregts (@Mamboleoo) on CodePen. Here are the four steps to make the above demo work: Get mouse and touch events from the user Calculate the mouse offsets from its origin Save The post Creating a Panning Effect

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VuePress Static Site Generator

VuePress is a new tool from Vue creator Evan You that spins up Vue projects that are more on the side of websites based on content and markup than progressive web applications and does it with a few strokes of the command line. We talk a lot about Vue around here, from a five-part series on getting started with it to a detailed implementation of a serverless checkout cart But, like anything new, even the basics of getting started can The post Vu

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Choosing a Responsive Email Framework: MJML vs. Foundation for Emails

Implementing responsive email design can be a bit of a drag. Building responsive emails isn‘t simple at all, it is like taking a time machine back to 2001 when we were all coding website layouts in tables using Dreamweaver and Fireworks. But there‘s hope! We have tools available that can make building email much easier and more like coding a modern site. Let‘s take a look at a couple of different frameworks that set out to simpl

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Native-Like Animations for Page Transitions on the Web

Some of the most inspiring examples I‘ve seen of front end development have involved some sort of page transitions that look slick, like they do in mobile apps. However, even though the imagination for these types of interactions seem to abound, their presence on actual sites that I visit do not. There are a number of ways to accomplish these types of movement! Here‘s what we‘ll be building: Demo Site GitHub Repo We‘l

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Hey hey `font-display`

Y‘all know about font-display? It‘s pretty great. It‘s a CSS property that you can use within @font-face blocks to control how, visually, that font loads. Font loading is really pretty damn complicated. Here‘s a guide from Zach Leatherman to prove it, which includes over 10 font loading strategies, including strategies that involve critical inline CSS of subsets of fonts combined with loading the rest of the fonts later th

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BigCommerce: eCommerce Your Way (and Design Awards!)

Huge thanks to BigCommerce for sponsoring CSS-Tricks this week! Here‘s the basics: BigCommerce is a hosted eCommerce platform. In just a few minutes, anybody can build their own online store. From a personal perspective, I‘d suggest to any of my friends and family to go this route. CMS-powered websites are complicated enough, let alone feature-packed eCommerce websites. Please go with a solution that does it all for you so your site w

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Museum of Websites

The team at Kapwing has collected a lot of images from the Internet Archive‘s Wayback Machine and presented a history of how the homepage of popular websites like Google and the New York Times have changed over time. It‘s super interesting. I particularly love how Amazon has evolved from a super high information dense webpage that sort of looks like a blog to basically a giant carousel that takes over the whole screen. Direct Link to

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1 HTML Element + 5 CSS Properties = Magic!

Let‘s say I told you we can get the results below with just one HTML element and five CSS properties for each. No SVG, no images (save for the background on the root that‘s there just to make clear that our one HTML element has some transparent parts), no JavaScript. What would you think that involves? The desired results. Well, this article is going to explain just how to do this and then also show how to make things fun The post 1

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