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The Free-Trade Paradox

Economists mayhave to accept that convincing most people of the value of free trade is a losing fight.

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America‘s Long Goodbye

The turbulence of the Trump administration is a symptom of a wider, and more permanent, shift: the passing of the generation of leaders formed by World War II and their replacement by a new crop of politicians, who no longer understand the vital importance of American global leadership.

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Trump Doesn‘t Like Traveling. That‘s Bad for Diplomacy.

By avoiding foreign countries, Trump hurts American diplomacy-and misunderstands how international dealmaking really works.

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The Trouble With the ‘Working Hypothesis‘

Oren Cass, domestic issues director for Mitt Romney‘s 2012 presidential campaign and a writer for National Review and other journals, has produced a conservative‘s treatise on the social and economic ills of America, and what might be done to repair them.

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The Fourth Founding

The United States can found a new world order after Trump.

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Congo Kicks the Can Down the Road

By demonstrating to Congolese that true reform is unlikely to happen through the ballot box, the recent electionhas sown the seeds for deepening disorder and instability down the line.

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Trump‘s Foreign Policy Is No Longer Unpredictable

At the two-year mark, it is now clear that the president is dominating the struggle against the national security establishement to determine the administraion‘s foreign policy.

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The Retreat of African Democracy

In the decade following the Cold War, Africa saw many democratic success stories. In 1991, Benin and Zambia were the first former dictatorships to hold multiparty elections after the fall of the Soviet Union. In both countries, the opposition triumhed. South Africa replaced apartheid with majority rule in 1994, and soon after that, Nelson Mandela was elected president. Ghana, Kenya, and Malawi also held elections and saw power change hands. All t

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Deepfakes and the New Disinformation War

Thanks to the rise of ‘deepfakes‘-highly realistic and difficult-to-detect digital manipulations of audio or video-it is becoming easier than ever to portray someone saying or doing something he or she never said or did, with potentially disastrous consequences for politics.

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Chinas Innovation Wall

In a bid to end its dependence on foreign intellectual property and become a global power in science and technology, China is attempting to foster indigenous innovation. Are the U.S. government and business community right to be worried about threats to free trade and intellectual property rights?

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Breaking the Ice

In defending its vital interests in the Arctic, the United States lacks a critical tool: mighty nuclear-powered icebreakers that would solidify its economic and strategic role in the region. Russia is surging ahead in this area, and the United States must catch up.

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From Brazil to Wikipedia

For technologies from the global South, worldwide success usually means shedding local ties and, should all go well, returning home triumphant. It is a treacherous road, and most of the benefits of such projects will never make it to the communities in which they started. But the alternative strategy of focusing on local problems and solutions is even less appealing.

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Globalization 4.0

Te world today needs a new framework for global cooperation in order to preserve peace and accelerate progress. After the cataclysm of World War II, leaders designed a set of institutional structures to enable the postwar world to trade, collaborate, and avoid war-first in the West and eventually around much of the globe. Faced with a changing world, today‘s leaders must undertake such a project again.

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How the U.S. Can Step Up in the South China Sea

In devising how best to lead the effort to counter China in the South China Sea, Washington could take a page from its own playbook in the East China Sea.

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What Syria Stands to Lose

U.S. policy in northeast Syria is working: a modest investment of U.S. tax dollars has allowed a fragile stability to hold in a place that once served as a hotbed of extremism and ISIS militancy.This achievement hangs in the balance as facts on the ground in Washington shape facts on the ground in Syria.

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Why Iran Waits

Iran has continued to comply with the restrictions on its nuclear program under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action despite U.S. withdrawal.

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Turkey‘s Bid for Religious Leadership

Under the leadership of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, whose Justice and Development Party (AKP) has Islamist roots, religion has become a critical instrument of Turkish foreign policy.

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How America Lost Faith in Expertise

In many ways, the populist surge that brought Donald Trump to office represents a rejection of experts and all they represent. Americans today see ignorance as a virtue. Here‘s why they‘re very, very wrong.

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