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The Stories China Tells

In his insightful new book, the historian Rana Mitter opens a window into the legacy of China‘s experience of World War II.

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India‘s Farmers Will Benefit From Reforms

Right now they are up in arms, but change is necessary.

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China Is Not Ten Feet Tall

Policymakers in Washington must be able to distinguish between the image Beijing presents and the realities it confronts.

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Japan Is the New Leader of Asia‘s Liberal Order

Washington must learn to follow its longtime ally in the Indo-Pacific.

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An Unsentimental China Policy

U.S. policy works best when focused realistically on geopolitical objectives essential to protect American interests.

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The Roots of Cultural Genocide in Xinjiang

China‘s imperial past hangs over the Uyghurs.

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China‘s Inequality Will Lead It to a Stark Choice

A new oligarchy can be restrained only by the government that made it.

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Why Are Al Qaeda Leaders in Iran?

What a prisoner exchange reveals about an unlikely relationship.

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The Real Regional Problem With the Iran Deal

Biden needs to change the preferences of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates if he is to make them useful partners in negotiations with Iran.

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Biden‘s Narrow Window of Opportunity on Iran

To have any hope of salvaging a nuclear deal with Iran, the administration will have to move fast.

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Colossus Constrained

Only if the United States gets its own house in order will it have the wherewithal to lead beyond its shores.

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How the WTO Changed China

It‘s not impossible to foster positive change in China, but it will be uneven, contested, and require ongoing pressure from the outside.

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Development Depends on More Than Aid

The Biden administration should empower the DFC, a new U.S. agency that can make a difference for people living in extreme poverty and for stability around the world.

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The Fractured Power

Experiences from elsewhere can provide valuable instruction for how to overcome American tribalism.

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Democracy on the Defense

To address the threat of resurgent authoritarians, the world‘s democracies need to commit to bold action.

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U.S.-Saudi Relations and the Oil Crises of the 1980s

In the next five to ten years, the industrial world‘s demand for oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries is likely to catch up with the amounts that OPEC countries will be able or willing to make available for export. The leading oil exporter, with more than a fourth of the world total, is Saudi Arabia; the world‘s largest consumer of oil - and since the lifting of import quotas in the spring of 1973 its leading imp

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Does Saudi Arabia Still Matter?

Four authors refuel the debate on Saudi oil; Edward Morse and James Richard reply.

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Back to the Bazaar

The United States has an opportunity to set new terms for its alliances in the Middle East. The bargain struck with Egypt and Saudi Arabia after the Gulf War seemed successful for a decade, but now the United States is facing the consequences: Washington backed Cairo‘s and Riyadh‘s authoritarian regimes, and they begat al Qaeda. The Bush administration should heed the lesson.

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Trump and Saudi Arabia

U.S. President Donald Trump should rethink important elements of the so-called special relationship with Saudi Arabia. Specifically, the United States should cease to offer unconditional support for the regime, as such backing legitimizes the regime‘s excesses and makes Washington vulnerable to accusations of supporting dictatorship.

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The King and Us

The exchange of oil for security no longer defines the relationship between Saudi Arabia and the United States. Still, the two countries can restore healthy ties by addressing common concerns such as Pakistan and the Palestinian territories.

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Emerging Markets Aren‘t Out of the Woods Yet

Original sin hasn‘t gone completely.

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Trump Is Abandoning Security Cooperation

The United States has stopped signing new military deals.

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Opioids of the Masses

In 2016, nearly 50,000 people died of opioid overdoses in the United States, and, per capita, almost as many died in Canada. From 2000 to 2016, more Americans died of overdoses than died in World War I and World War II combined. Yet even these grim numbers understate the impact of opioid abuse, because for every person who dies, many more live with addiction. The White House Council of Economic Advisers has estimated that the epidemic cost the U.

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Climate Shocks and Humanitarian Crises

Which countries are most at risk from climate-related instability and humanitarian crises in the coming years?

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