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Breathtaking Alarm Clock Looks Like it Came From a 1960 Fallout Shelter

All the hardcore geeks have alarm clocks where the bell striker is a hard disk read head or at least they‘ll be building them after seeing this. [Senile Data Systems] created an industrial voltage alarm clock out of decade counters that looks like it was unearthed from a fallout shelter read more

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Boom Hopes to Reignite Supersonic Travel with XB-1

Since the last Concorde rolled to a stop in 2003, supersonic flight has been limited almost exclusively to military aircraft. Many have argued that it‘s an example of our civilization seeming to slip backwards on the technological scale, akin to returning to the Age of Sail. There‘s no debating that read more

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Recreating Retrocomputers Hack Chat

Join us on Wednesday, August 12 at noon Pacific for the Recreating Retrocomputers Hack Chat with Mike Gardi! Building the first commercial computers in the late 1950s and early 1960s was certainly a complex a task, but building the computer industry was even harder. Sure, engineers were already getting on read more

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Acoustic Camera Uses Many, Many Microphones

If you‘re a human or other animal with two ears, you‘ll probably find great utility in your ability to identify the direction of sounds in the world around you. Of course, this is really just a minimal starting point for such abilities. When [John Duffy] set out to build his read more

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The Weather Station at the Top of the World

The crown jewels of the Earth‘s mountain ranges, the Himalayas, are unsurpassed in their beauty, their height, and their deadly attraction to adventurers, both professional and amateur. The gem of the Himalayas is, of course, Mount Everest, known as Sagarmatha to the Nepalis and Chomolungma to the Tibetans. At 8,848 read more

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The Zero Terminal 3: A Pop-Out Keyboard Linux Computer in Your Pocket

The mobile phone revolution has delivered us attractively packaged and convenient computing in our pockets, but without the easy hackability we like in our community. Meanwhile the advent of single board computers has given us affordable super-powerful hardware that can run a very capable GNU/Linux operating system and fulfill all read more

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Unique Instrument Plucks Out Notes on a Ruler

How does one describe the notes that come from a ruler that is anchored on one end and then plucked? The best word we can come up with is wubulation. So would that make this ruler-plucking synthesizer a wubulator? Or perhaps a wubatron? Whatever we decide to call it, [ read more

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45 Minute Podcast Served Up On A Floppy Disk

Near the turn of the millenium, portable media players like the iPod led to the development of the podcast. The format generally consists of content similar to talk-based radio, and is typically served up in modern codecs like AAC, M4A and MP3. However, [Sean Haas] decided these were all too read more

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Talking Head Teaches Laplace Transform

Most people who deal with electronics have heard of the Fourier transform. That mathematical process makes it possible for computers to analyze sound, video, and it also offers critical math insights for tasks ranging from pattern matching to frequency synthesis. The Laplace transform is less familiar, even though it is read more

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Hackaday Links: August 9, 2020

We regret to admit this, but we completely missed the fact that Windows 10 turned five years old back in March. Granted, things were a little weird back then at least it seemed weird at the time; from the current perspective, things were downright normal then. Regardless, our belated read more

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How About a Nice Cuppa TEA Laser?

If lasers are your hobby, you face a conundrum. There are so many off-the-shelf lasers that use so many different ways of amplifying and stimulating light that the whole thing can be downright unstimulating. Keeping things fresh therefore requires rolling your own lasers, and these DIY nitrogen TEA and read more

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Hands-On: Internet of Batteries Quantum Badge Brings Badgelife Add-Ons the Power and Internet They Crave

Our friends in the Whiskey Pirates crew sent me the unofficial DEF CON badge they built this year. The Internet of Batteries QUANTUM provides power and connectivity to the all-important add-on badges of DC28. The front of the badge is absolutely gorgeous to the point I don‘t really want to read more

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Recreating Early Apple Mice For the Modern Era

At a time when practical graphical user interfaces were only just becoming a reality on desktop computers, Apple took a leap of faith and released one of the first commercially available mice back in 1983. It was criticized as being little more than a toy back then, but we all read more

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OAK Vision Modules Help You See The Forest And The Trees

OpenCV is an open source library of computer vision algorithms, its power and flexibility made many machine vision projects possible. But even with code highly optimized for maximum performance, we always wish for more. Which is why our ears perk up whenever we hear about a hardware accelerated vision module, read more

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Tune Into the Bonnaroo That No One Gets to Go To

Just like everything else in 2020, the four-day, multi-stage festival of music and art known as Bonnaroo has been cancelled. This would have been [Guy Dupont]‘s fifth year making the journey to Tennessee with his friend. Since they couldn‘t go, [Guy] decided to build an interactive Bonnaroo mix tape into read more

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Animal Crossing IRL with Nova Lights To Mark The Passage Of Time

We feature a lot of clocks here at Hackaday, but it‘s not often that one comes along and makes us stop in our tracks and reconsider the fundamental question: just what is a clock? [Charlyn] has managed it though, with her Nova Light clock, which doesn‘t so much measure the read more

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Print With Plasma!

Over the years there have been a variety of methods for a computer to commit its thoughts to paper. Be it a daisy wheel, a dot matrix, a laser, or an inkjet, we‘ve all cursed at a recalcitrant printer. There‘s another type of printer that maybe we don‘t think of read more

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Wood-Fired Hot Tub For The End Of The World

It‘s one of the idyls of our age, to imagine oneself lounging in a hot tub watching a golden sunset, glass of wine in hand and the love of your life at your side. Along the way though it‘s one that‘s become diverted from the original, instead of a Scandinavian read more

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Vintage Gauges Turned Classy Weather Display

It‘s always good to see old hardware saved from the junk pile, especially when the end result is as impressive as this analog gauge weather display put together by [Build Comics]. It ended up being a truly multidisciplinary project, combing not only restoration work and modern microcontroller trickery, but a read more

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A Shell? A Programming Language? Relax! It‘s Both!

Every time we publish a Linux hack that uses a shell script, someone will chime in about how awful it is to program shell scripts. While we like the ubiquity and efficiency, we can‘t disagree that the shell is a bit of a hack itself. [Axel Lijencrantz] wants to change read more

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DIY HID, OMG!

William English, one of the creators of the mouse back in the 60s, passed away last week. And that got me thinking of how amazing it would have been to be in the place that was inventing what would become modern computing interfaces. What a special time! Of course, they read more

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Why Buy The Newer Model, When You Can Just Replicate Its User Interface?

Every now and then, along comes an awesome hack from years past that we missed at the time. We kick ourselves for somehow missing such amazing work, and since it‘s that good, we share it with you with apologies. Such is the case with [Andrei Anatska]‘s faithful replication of the read more

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An Amiga Sampler 30 Years Later

There was a magic moment for a few years around the end of the 1980s, when home computers were better than professional ones. That‘s a mighty grand pronouncement, but it refers to the crop of 16-bit home computers that genuinely were far better than nearly all PCs at the time read more

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Self-Contained Tape Loader For the ZX Spectrum

While these days we‘re blessed with the magic of always-on internet connections and cloud services, back in the day software was delivered on physical media. Some of the most reviled media were data tapes, much maligned for their glacial loading times. However, the tangibility did give them some charm, and read more

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