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GPS Self-Adjusting Clock With An E-Ink Display

If you mention a clock that receives its time via radio, most people will think of one taking a long wave signal from a station such as WWVB, MSF, or DCF77. A more recent trend however has been for clocks that set themselves from orbiting navigation satellites, and an example read more

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Radio Piracy on the High Seas: Commercial Demand for Taboo Music

The true story of pirate radio is a complicated fight over the airwaves. Maybe you have a picture in your mind of some kid in his mom‘s basement playing records, but the pirate stations we are thinking about Radio Caroline and Radio Northsea International were major business operations. read more

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3D Printering: The Quest for Printable Food

A video has been making the rounds on social media recently that shows a 3D printed steak developed by a company called NovaMeat. In the short clip, a machine can be seen extruding a paste made of ingredients such as peas and seaweed into a shape not entirely unlike that read more

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Power Measurement Oscilloscope Style

If you want to measure voltage you reach for a voltmeter. Current? An ammeter. Resistance? An ohmmeter. But what about measuring AC power? A watt meter? Usually. But if you know what to do, you could also reach for your oscilloscope. If you don‘t know what to do, [Jim Pytel] read more

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Stealing DNA By Phone

Data exfiltration via side channel attacks can be a fascinating topic. It is easy to forget that there are so many different ways that electronic devices affect the physical world other than their intended purpose. And creative security researchers like to play around with these side-effects for fun and profit‘. read more

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Self-aware Robotic Arm

If you ever tried to program a robotic arm or almost any robotic mechanism that has more than 3 degrees of freedom, you know that a big part of the programming goes to the programming of the movements themselves. What if you built a robot, regardless of how you connect read more

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Texting With A Teletype

How do you get the kids interested in old technology? By connecting it to a phone, obviously. Those kids and their phones. When [Marek] got his hands on an old-school teletype, he hooked it up to a GSM network, with all the bells and whistles including a 40mA current loop read more

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Making Microfluidics Simpler With Shrinky Dinks

It‘s as if the go-to analogy these days for anything technical is, It‘s like a series of tubes. Explanations thus based work better for some things than others, and even when the comparison is apt from a physics standpoint it often breaks down in the details. With microfluidics, the analogy read more

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Mowerbot Keeping The Lawn In Check Since 1998

Mowing the lawn is a chore that serves as an excellent character building excercise for a growing child. However, children are expensive and the maintenance requirements can be prohibitive. Many instead turn to robots to lend a hand, and [Rue Mohr] is no exception. [Rue]‘s creation goes by the name read more

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The Simplest Of Pseudo Random Number Generators

A truly random number is something that is surprisingly difficult to generate. A typical approach is to generate the required element of chance from a natural and unpredictable source, such as radioactive decay or thermal noise. By contrast it is extremely easy to generate numbers that look random but in read more

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Circuit-Level Game Boy: Upping Emulation Ante By Simulating Every Cycle

Usually when writing emulation software for a system like the Game Boy, one makes sure to take as many shortcuts as possible in order to reduce the resources required for the emulation. This has however the unfortunate side-effect that it reduces the overall accuracy of the emulation and with it read more

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Component Shelf Life: How To Use All That Old Junk

There are two types of Hackaday readers: those that have a huge stock of parts they‘ve collected over the years (in other words, an enormous pile of junk) and those that will have one a couple of decades from now. It‘s easy to end up with a lot of stuff, read more

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Need A Small Keyboard? Build Your Own!

If you want keyboards, we can get you keyboards. If you want a small keyboard, you might be out of luck. Unless you‘re hacking Blackberry keyboards or futzing around with tiny tact switches, there‘s no good solution to small, thin, customization keyboards. There‘s one option though: silicone keyboards. No one‘s read more

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Get Your Acrylic Bends Just Right

Acrylic is a popular material. It‘s easy to find, attractive, and available in all manner of colors, thicknesses, and grades. Being a thermoplastic, it‘s also simple to apply heat and form it in various different ways. If you‘re wanting to build parts out of sheet acrylic, you might find a read more

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A Year-Long Experiment In OLED Burn-In

If you need to add a small display to your project, you‘re not going to do much better than a tiny OLED display. These tiny display are black and white, usually found in resolutions of 12864 or some other divisible-by-two value, they‘re driven over I2C, the libraries are readily available, read more

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3D Printing a Real Heart

As 3D printing becomes more and more used in a wide range of fields, medical science is not left behind. From the more standard uses such as printing medical equipment and prosthetics to more advanced uses like printing cartilages and bones, the success of 3D printing technologies in the medical read more

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Get Coding With This Atari 2600 Development Suite

Sometimes the urge strikes to get busy coding for an old retro system, but unfortunately the bar to entry can be high. There‘s a need to find a workable compiler, let alone trying to figure out how to load code onto original vintage hardware. It doesn‘t have to be so read more

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Mechanical Integration With KiCad

Eagle and Fusion are getting all the respect for integrating electronic and mechanical design, but what about KiCad? Are there any tools out there that allow you to easily build an enclosure for your next printed circuit board? [Maurice] has one solution, and it seamlessly synchronizes KiCad and FreeCAD. KiCad read more

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Steel-Reinforced 3D Prints

Continuing on the never-ending adventure of how to make a 3D print stronger, [Brauns CNC] is coming at us with a new technique that involves steel-reinforced 3D printed parts. We‘ve seen plenty of methods to create stronger 3D prints, from using carbon fiber filament to simply printing the part in read more

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JigFab Makes Woodworking Easier

Woodworking is an age-old craft that requires creativity and skill to get the best results. Experienced hands get the best results, while the new builder may struggle to confidently produce even basic pieces. JigFab is here to level the playing field somewhat. Much of the skill in woodworking comes with read more

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Power Stacker, A Modular Battery Bank

Many of us will own a lithium-ion power pack or two, usually a brick containing a few 18650 cylindrical cells and a 5 V converter for USB charging a cellphone. They‘re an extremely useful item to have in your carry-around, for a bit of extra battery life when your day‘s read more

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Hack my House: UL Certification and Turning the lights on with an ESP8266

It‘s hard to imagine a smart house without smart lighting. Maybe it‘s laziness, but the ability to turn a light on or off without walking over to the switch is a must-have, particularly once the lap is occupied by a sleeping infant. It‘s tempting to just stuff a relay in read more

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KiCad and FreeCAD Hack Chat

Join us Wednesday at noon Pacific time for the KiCad and FreeCAD Hack Chat led by Anool Mahidharia! The inaugural KiCon conference is kicking off this Friday in Chicago, and KiCad aficionados from all over the world are gathering to discuss anything and everything about the cross-platform, open-source electronic design read more

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Why Satellites of the Future Will be Built to Burn

There‘s no shortage of ways a satellite in low Earth orbit can fail during the course of its mission. Even in the best case scenario, the craft needs to survive bombardment by cosmic rays and tremendous temperature variations. To have even a chance of surviving the worst, such as a read more

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