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Plasma Globe Reveals Your Next Clue

If you like solving puzzles out in the real world, you‘ve probably been to an escape room before, or are at least familiar with its concept of getting (voluntarily) locked inside a place and searching for clues that will eventually lead to a key or door lock combination that gets read more

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Small Lightsail Will Propel Cubesat

If you read science fiction, you are probably familiar with the idea of a light or solar sail. A very large and lightweight sail catches solar wind that accelerates a payload connected to the sail. Some schemes replace the sun with a laser. Like most things, sails have pros and read more

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Dry Your Boots With The Internet of Things

If you live somewhere cold, where the rain, snow and slush don‘t abate for weeks at a time, you‘ve probably dealt with wet boots. On top of the obvious discomfort, this can lead to problems with mold and cause blisters during extended wear. For this reason, boot dryers exist. [mark] read more

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Failed Scooter Proves the Worth of Modular Design

Like many mechanically inclined parents, [Tony Goacher] prefers building over buying. So when his son wanted an electric scooter, his first stop wasn‘t to the toy store, but to AliExpress for a 48V hub motor kit. Little did he know that the journey to getting that scooter road-ready would be read more

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A Better Motor For Chickenwalkers

The last decade or so has seen remarkable advances in motor technology for robotics and hobby applications. We‘re no longer stuck with crappy brushed motors, and now we have fancy (and cheap!) stepper motors, brushless motors for drones, and servo motors. This has led to some incredible achievements; drones are read more

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Preserving Computer History Hack Chat

Join us on Wednesday 26 June 2019 at noon Pacific for the Preserving Computer History Hack Chat with Dag Spicer! In our age of instant access to the seeming total of human knowledge at the swipe of a finger, museums may seem a little anachronistic. But the information available at read more

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Ditch the Switch: a Soft Latching Circuit Roundup

For some of us, there are few sounds more satisfying than the deep resonant thunk of a high quality toggle switch slamming into position. There isn‘t an overabundance of visceral experiences when working with electronics, so we like to savor them when we get the chance. But of course there‘s read more

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Snoopy Come Home: The Search for Apollo 10

When it comes to the quest for artifacts from the Space Race of the 1960s, few items are more sought after than flown hardware. Oh sure, there have been stories of small samples of the 382 kg of moon rocks and dust that were returned at the cost of something read more

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Does The Cheese Grater Do A Great Grate Of Cheese?

Apple‘s newest Mac Pro with its distinctive machined grille continues to excite interest, but until now there has been one question on the lips of nobody. It‘s acquired the moniker Cheese grater, but can it grate cheese? [Winston Moy] set out to test its effectiveness in the kitchen with a read more

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The Practical Approach to Keeping Your Laser in Focus

You could be forgiven for thinking that laser cutters and engravers are purely two dimensional affairs. After all, when compared to something like your average desktop 3D printer, most don‘t have much in the way of a Z axis: the head moves around at a fixed height over the workpiece. read more

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Raspberry Pi 4 Just Released: Faster CPU, More Memory, Dual HDMI Ports

The Raspberry Pi 4 was just released. This is the newest version of the Raspberry Pi and offers a better CPU and more memory than the Raspberry Pi 3, dual HDMI outputs, better USB and Ethernet performance, and will remain in production until January, 2026. There are three varieties of read more

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The Benefits Of Restoring a C64 With A Modern FPGA Board

The Commodore 64 was the highest selling computer of all time, and will likely forever remain that way due to the fragmentation of models in the market ever since. Due to this, it‘s hardly surprising that it still has a strong following many years after its heyday. This means that read more

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Caching In on Program Performance

Most of us have a pretty simple model of how a computer works. The CPU fetches instructions and data from memory, executes them, and writes data back to memory. That model is a good enough abstraction for most of what we do, but it hasn‘t really been true for a read more

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Hackaday Links: June 16th, 2019

OpenSCAD has been updated. The latest release of what is probably the best 3D modeling tool has been in the works for years now, and we‘ve got some interesting features now. Of note, there‘s a customizer, for allowing parametrizing designs with a GUI. There‘s 3D mouse support, so drag out read more

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Split Flap Clock Keeps Time Thanks to Custom Frequency Converter

Why would anyone put as much effort into resurrecting a 1970s split-flap clock as [mitxela] did when he built this custom PLL frequency converter? We‘re not sure, but we do like the results. The clock is a recreation of the prop from the classic 1993 film, Groundhog Day, rigged read more

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VR On The 6502

The MOS Technology 6502 was one of the more popular processors of the 1980s. It ran the Commodore 64, the NES in a modified form, and a whole bunch of other hardware, too. By modern standards, it‘s barely fit to run a calculator, but no matter - [Nick Bild] built read more

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This Upgraded Power Wheels Toy Is Powerful Enough To Need Traction Control

A Lamborghini Aventador Is beyond the budget of all but the most well-heeled fathers, but [CodeMakesItGo] came pretty close with a gift for his young son. It was a Lamborghini Aventador all right, but only the 6V Power Wheels ride-on version. As such it was laclustre even for a youngster read more

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A TTL CPU, Minimising Its Chip Count

By now we should all be used to the astonishing variety of CPUs that have come our way created from discrete logic chips. We‘ve seen everything from the familiar Von Neumann architectures to RISC and ever transport-triggered architecture done in 74 TTL derivatives, and fresh designs remain a popular project read more

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Home Made Gears Save This Shredder

It‘s very likely that a majority of readers will have had a gear fail in a piece of equipment, causing it to be unrepairable. This is a problem particularly with plastic gears, which shed teeth faster than a child who has discovered the financial returns of the Tooth Fairy. [BcastLar] read more

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A Two Metre Bridge Across The Atlantic For The First Time

Amateur radio is a pursuit with many facets, some of which hold more attention than others for the hacker. Though there have been radio amateurs for a century it still has boundaries that are being tested, and sometimes they come in surprising places. A recent first involved something you might read more

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Banana Bomb Is Likely To Get You In Trouble

If there‘s one thing Hollywood loves, it‘s a ticking clock to create drama. Nuclear weapons, terrorist bombs, and all manner of other devices have been seen featuring foreboding numbers counting down on a series of 7-segment displays. In this vein, [deshipu] developed a rather ridiculous take on the classic trope. read more

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Coffee Tables, Computers, And Railways

If you were a British kid at any time from the 1950s to the 1980s, the chances are that your toy shop had a train set in it. Not just any train set, but a full model railway layout in a glass case roughly the size of a pool table, read more

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FPGA Soft CPU is Superscalar

We will admit it: mostly when we see a homebrew CPU design on an FPGA, it is a simple design that wouldn‘t raise any eyebrows in the 1970s or 1980s. Not so with [Henry Wong‘s] design, though. His x86-like design does superscalar out-of-order execution, just like big commercial modern CPUs. read more

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An ESP8266 Clock With Built-In Notifications

When we recently discussed the skills that we might wish to impart upon a youngster, one of those discussed was the ability to speak more than one language. If any demonstration were required as to why that might be the case, it comes today in [Byfeel]‘s Notif‘Heure, an ESP8266-powered clock read more

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