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Delightful Electromechanical Build Of A Jet Engine Model

[InterlinkKnight]‘s jet engine model is a delight to behold and to puzzle out. Many of us have been there before. We know how to build something, we know it‘s not the most up-to-date approach, but we just can‘t help ourselves and so we go for it anyway. The result is often a fun and ingenious mix of the mechanical and the electrical. His electric jet engine model is just that. Being a model, this one isn‘t required to prod

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These Small PCBs are Made for Model Rocketry

Model rocketry hobbyists are familiar with the need to roll their own solutions when putting high-tech features into rockets, and a desire to include a microcontroller in a rocket while still keeping things flexible and modular is what led [concretedog] to design a system using 22 mm diameter stackable PCBsdesigned to easily fit inside rocket bodies. The system uses a couple of 2 mm threaded rods for robust mounting and provides an ATTiny85 micro

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Fully 3D Printed Nerf Thirst Zapper

In case you weren‘t aware, there is a whole community out there that revolves around customizing NERF guns. In that community is a subculture that builds their own NERF guns, and withinthat group is a sub-subculture that 3D prints NERF guns. So next time you are contemplating howesoteric your little corner of the hacking world is, keep that in mind. Anyway, [Wesker] is currently making his way in the world of 3D printed one-off NERF guns, a

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Microchip Introduces Tiny Cheap Linux Modules

Linux is in everything these days, and that means designers and engineers are crying out for a simple, easy-to-use module that simplifies the design of building a product to do something with Linux. The best example of this product category would probably be the Raspberry Pi Compute Module, followed by the C.H.I.P. Pro and its GR8 module. There are dozens of boards with Allwinner and Mali chips stuffed inside that can be used to build a Linux pro

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You‘ve Never Seen A Flipping Eyeball Like This One!

Inspired by some impressive work on textile flip-bit displays, and with creative steampunk outfits to create for Christmas, [Richard Sewell] had the idea for a flippable magnetic eye in the manner of a flip-dot display. These devices are bistable mechanical displays in which a magnet is suspended above a coil of wire, and flipped in orientation under the influence of a magnetic field from the coil. In [Richard]‘s case the eyeball was provid

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Tachometer Uses Light, Arduinos

To measure how fast something spins, most of us will reach for a tachometer without thinking much about how it works. Tachometers are often found in cars to measure engine RPM, but handheld units can be used for measuring the speed of rotation for other things as well. While some have mechanical shafts that must make physical contact with whatever you‘re trying to measure, [electronoobs] has created a contactless tachometer that uses infrar

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Robotic Laser Keeps Cat Entertained While You Hack

Whether it‘s our own cat or a neighbor‘s, many of us have experienced the friendly feline keeping us company while we work, often contributing on the keyboard, sticking itshead where our hands are for a closer look, or sitting on needed parts. So how to keep the crafty kitty busy elsewhere? Thisroboticized laser on a pan-tilt mechanism from the [circuit.io team] should do the trick. The laser is a 650 nm laser diode mounted on a 3D pr

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Stretched PC Case Turned GPU Cryptominer

We don‘t do financial planning here at Hackaday, so we won‘t weigh in on the viability of making money miningcryptocurrency in such a volatile market. But we will say that ifyou‘re going to build a machine to hammer away at generating Magical Internet Monies, you might as well make it cool. Even if you don‘t turn a profit, at least you‘ll have something interesting to look at while you weep over your electricity bill

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Tiny Quad Core Module Available Soon

We get a lot of new product announcements here at Hackaday, and werun across even more. As excited as a manufacturer might be about their latest Raspberry Pi killer or cheaper Arduino clone, we usually don‘t have much to say about new products unless there is something really interesting about them. Our attention was piqued though when we saw the NeutisN5. Shipping in April, the device packs a quad-core ARM processor running at 1.3 GHz with

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3D Printing Brings a Child‘s Imagination to Life

Telling somebody that you‘re going to make their dreams come true is a bold, and potentially kind of creepy, claim. But it‘s one of those things that isn‘t supposed to be taken literally; it don‘t mean that you‘re actually going to peer into their memories, extract an idea, and then manifest it into reality. That‘s just crazy talk, it‘s a figure of speech. As it turns out, there‘s at least one perso

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Arduino Watchdog Has Bite And Doesn‘t Need Treats

My dog Jasper isn‘t much of a watchdog: he‘s too interested in sleeping and chasing my cats to keep an eye on things. Fortunately, [Vadim] has come up with a more reliable alternative with this simple Arduino watchdog. It‘s designed to work with crypto coin mining rigs, but it could be easily adapted for other high-uptime uses, such as file servers or doomsday weapons. The way it works is simple: a small program on the watched

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Rapidly Prototyping Prosthetics, Braille, and Wheelchairs

We live in an amazing time where the availability of rapid prototyping tools and expertise to use them has expanded faster than at any other time in human history. We now have an amazing ability to quickly bring together creative solutions perfect examples of this are the designs for specialized arm prosthetics, Braille printing, and custom wheelchair builds that came together last week. Earlier this month we published details about the S.T.E.A.

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‘The Commodore Story‘ Documentary Premieres Today

What is it about a computer that was introduced 36 years ago by a company that would be defunct 12 years later that engenders such passion that people still collect it to this day? We‘re talking about the Commodore 64, of course, the iconic 8-bit wonder that along with the other offerings from Commodore International served as the first real computer to millions of us. There‘s more to the passion that Commodore aficionados exhibit tha

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DIY Cryogel Sustains Live Cells

We like to think our readers are on the cutting edge. With the advent of CRISPR kits at home and DIY bio blooming in workshops across the world, we wanted to share a video which may be ahead of its time. [The Thought Emporium] has just shown us a way to store eukaryotic cells at room temperature. His technique is based on a paper published in Nature which he links to from the YouTube page, but you can see his video after the break. Eukaryotic cel

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Next Week: Bring-A-Hack In NYC

Hackaday, along with Ultimaker and New Lab, are hosting an extravaganza of super hacks and more in New York next week. Grab a project you‘re working on and join us on Wednesday, February 28 in Brooklyn. This is all about showcasing the coolest, newest stuff being worked on by makers, hackers, artists, and engineers. Get ready to talk hardware, stare into far too many LEDs, and enjoy drinks and camaraderie. The event is being hosted by New L

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A Robot For Everything: Now Even Zippers

Sometimes we see projects that are so clever while being remarkably simple, that we can‘t help thinking: Why didn‘t I think of that! Take [Haresh Karnan]‘s zipper robot, for example. It‘s a well-designed 3D-printed shell with two geared motors for traction, that can both undo and do up zippers. Behind that seemingly simple design probably lies a huge iterative design process to arrive at a shape perfect for the job, but th

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A Two Tapes Turing Machine

Though as with so many independent inventors the origins of computing can be said to have been arrived at through the work of many people, Alan Turing is certainly one of the foundational figures in computer science. His Turing machine was a thought-experiment computing device in which a program performs operations upon symbols printed on an infinite strip of tape, and can in theory calculate anything that any computer can. In practice, we do not

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Forth System-On-Chip Takes Us Back to the 80s

For anyone who has dealt with the programming language Forth, odds are good that you picked it up back in the 80s. Since the language is still in use for many applications, though, you might not have this sort of nostalgic feeling for the language that some might have. For that, though, you might want to try out [Richard]‘s implementation which simulates the microcomputers of the 80s using this unique language. The system has an FPGA-based

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This Radio Gets Pour Reception

When was the last time you poured water onto your radio to turn it on? Designed collaboratively by [Tore Knudsen], [Simone Okholm Hansen] and [Victor Permild], Pour Reception seeks to challenge what constitutes an interface, and how elements of play can create a new experience for a relatively everyday object. Lacking buttons or knobs of any kind, Pour Reception appears an inert acrylic box with two glasses resting on top. A detachable instructio

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Software Defined Television on an ESP32

Composite video from a single-board computer? Big deal every generation of Raspberry Pi has had some way of getting composite signals out and onto the retro monitor of your choice. But composite video from an ESP32? That‘s a thing now too. There are some limitations, of course, not least of which is finding a monitor that can accept a composite input, but since[bitluni]‘s hack uses zero additional components, we can overlook those. I

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3D-Printed Parts Torture-Tested in Nitro Engine - Briefly

Additive manufacturing has come a long way in a short time, and the parts you can turn out with some high-end 3D-printers rival machined metal in terms of durability. But consumer-grade technology generally lags the good stuff, so there‘s no way you can 3D-print internal combustion engine parts on a run of the mill printer yet, right? As it turns out, you can at least 3D-print connecting rods, if both the engine and your expectations are sc

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Skull Cane Proves Bondo Isn‘t Just for Dents

[Eric Strebel] is quickly becoming a favorite here at Hackaday. He‘s got a fantastic knack for turning everyday objects into something awesome, and he‘s kind of enough to document his builds for the viewing pleasure of hackers and makers everywhere. It also doesn‘t hurt that his voice and narration style gives us a real Bob Ross vibe. The latest Happy Accident out of his workshop is a neat light-up cane made from a ceramic skull

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QuickBASIC Lives On with QB64

When I got my first computer, a second hand 386 running MS-DOS 6.22, I didn‘t have an Internet connection. But I did have QuickBASIC installed and a stack of programming magazines the local library was throwing out, so I had plenty to keep myself busy. At the time, I thought QuickBASIC was more or less indistinguishable from magic. I could write simple code and compile it into an .exe, put it on a floppy, and give it to somebody else to run

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France Proposes Software Security Liability For Manufacturers, Open Source As Support Ends

It sometimes seems as though barely a week can go by without yet another major software-related hardware vulnerability story. As manufacturers grapple with the demands of no longer building simple appliances but instead supplying them containing software that may expose itself to the world over the Internet, we see devices shipped with insecure firmware and little care for its support or updating after the sale. The French government have a propo

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