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Stove Alarm Keeps The Kitchen Safe

Gas cooktops have several benefits, being able to deliver heat near-instantly, while also being highly responsive when changing temperature. However, there are risks involved with both open flames and the potential of leaving the gas on with the burner unlit. After a couple of close calls, [Bob] developed a simple solution to this safety issue. Most commercial products in this space work by detecting the heat from the cooktop, however this does n

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Generating Power with Wind, Water, and Solar

It is three weeks after the apocalypse. No zombies yet. But you do need to charge your cell phone. How do you quickly make a wind turbine? If you‘ve read this project, you might reach for a few empty water bottles. This educational project might not charge your phone without some extra work, but it does illustrate how to use water bottles to make a workable air scoop for turning a crank and possibly generating electricity. That takes care o

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FPGA used VHDL for Fractals

Over on GitHub, [ttsiodras] wanted to learn VHDL. So he started with an algorithm to do Mandelbrot sets and moved it to an FPGA. Because of the speed, he was able to accomplish real-time zooming. You can see a video of the results, below. The FPGA board is aZestSC1 that has a relatively old Xilinx Spartan 3 chip onboard. Still, it is plenty powerful enough for a task like this. The project doesn‘t directly drive a display. It does the math

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Easily Deboss Notebooks with a 3D Printed Stamp

While it‘s arguably a bit closer to the Arts Crafts region of the making spectrum upon which we don‘t usually tread on account ourl33t sense of superiority, we‘ve got to admit that the quick and easy notebook customization demonstrated by [Sean Hodgins] is very compelling. We don‘t put ink to dead trees with nearly the frequency we used to, but when we do it might as well be Hemingway-style with a little black Hackaday em

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Furby Plus Borges Equals Borgy

What do you get if you cross a Furby with a master of 20th Century literature? The Borgy. Argentinian hacker [Roni Bandini] found an old Furby and decided to hack it by altering its personality. His inspiration was the Argentinian writer Jorge Louis Borges, one of the pioneers of surrealist writing. The idea is that, at random times during the day, the Borgy will share a bit of wisdom from Borges to inspire and enlighten. [Roni] hacked the Furby

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An over-engineered LED Sign Board

Never underestimate the ability of makers in over thinking and over-engineering the simplest of problems and demonstrating human ingenuity. The RGB LED sign made by [Hans and team] over at the [Hackheim hackerspace] in Trondheim is a testament to this fact. As you would expect, the WS2812 RGB LEDs illuminate the sign. In this particular construction, an individual strip is responsible for each character. Powered by an ESP32 running FreeRTOS, the

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Advent Calendar ‘Tis the CNSeason

CNC machines are powerful tools when used correctly, but it‘s often necessary to test a new machine before getting into serious production work. This advent calendar is a great festive project that was designed to put a CNC through its paces. The calendar is made primarily from wood. This is an excellent choice for test machining projects, as it is softer and less likely to cause tool or machine damage when compared to steel or aluminum. Th

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Crystal Oscillators Explained

We‘ve read a lot about oscillators, but crystal oscillators seem to be a bit of a mystery. Hobby-level books tend to say, build a circuit like this and then mess with it until it oscillates. Engineering texts tend to go on about loop gains but aren‘t very clear about practice. A [circuit digest] post that continues a series on oscillators has a good, practical treatment of the subject. Crystals are made to have a natural resonant freq

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The Guts Of Switched Mode Power Supplies, Brought To You By Oscilloscope Repair

The Tektronix 2000 series of oscilloscopes are a mainstay for any electronics lab. They work, they‘re relatively cheap, they‘re good, and they‘re available in just about any surplus electronics store. [Mr.RC-Cam] has been hoarding one of these for twenty years, and like any classic piece of equipment, it needs a little refurbishment every now and again. Now, it‘s time. Here‘s how you repair one of the best values in

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Negative Voltage Pushes AVR to New Heights

If we say that a hacker is somebody who looks at a solved problem and can still come up with multiple alternative solutions, then [Charles Ouweland] absolutely meets the grade. Not that we needed more evidence of his hacker cred given what we‘ve seen from him before, but he recently wrote in to tell us about an interesting bit of problem solving which we think is a perfect example of the principle. He wanted to drive a salvaged seven segmen

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NTP Morse Code Clock Powered by ESP8266

We‘ve featured a great many unique clocks here on Hackaday, which have utilized nearly every imaginable way of conveying the current time. But of all these marvelous timepieces, the Morse code clock has the distinct honor of simultaneously being the easiest to construct and (arguably) the most difficult to read. As such, it‘s little surprise we don‘t see them very often. Which makes this latest entry into the field all the more

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VexRISC-V Exposed

If you want to use FPGAs, you‘ll almost always use an HDL like Verilog or VHDL. These are layers of abstraction just like using, say, a C compiler is to machine language or assembly code. There are other challenges to the throne such as SpinalHDL which have small but enthusiastic followings. [Tom] has a post about how the VexRISC-V CPU leverages SpinalHDL to make an extremely flexible system that is as efficient as plain Verilog. He says th

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Wearable Speeder Bikes Are Ready For A Night Out

While Hackaday is about as far from a fashion blog as you can possibly get, we have to admit we‘re absolutely loving the [bithead942] Winter 2018 Collection. His wife and daughter recently got to model his latest must have design: wearableStar Warsspeeder bikes; and judging by the video after the break they were certainly some of the best dressed at the Thanksgiving parade. [bithead942] started the build by taking careful measurements of a

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Artistic Images Made With Water Lens

It‘s said that beauty and art can be found anywhere, as long as you look for it. The latest art project from [dmitry] both looks in unassuming places for that beauty, and projects what it sees for everyone to view. Like most of his projects, it‘s able to produce its artwork in a very unconventional way. This particular project uses water as a lens, and by heating and cooling the water it produces a changing image. The art installation

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Liberating Birds For A Cheap Electric Scooter

A few months ago, several companies started deploying electric scooters on the sidewalks of cities around the United States. These scooters were standard, off-the-shelf electric scooters made in China, loaded up with battery packs, motors, and a brain box‘ that has a GPS unit, a cellular modem, and a few more electronics that turn this dumb electric scooter into something you can ride via an app. Dropping electronic waste on cities around t

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Building The World‘s Smallest Jet Turbine By Hand

There are very few machines as complex to build as a turbojet engine. The turbine blades on a commercial airliner are grown from a single crystal of metal. The engineering tolerances are crazy, and everything spins really, really fast. All of these problems aren‘t a concern for [Igor], who‘s building what will probably end up being the world‘s smallest turbojet engine. He‘s doing it in his home shop, and a lot of the work

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Racing the Beam on a Thin Client, in FPGAs

A few years back, a company by the name of Pano Logic launched a line of FPGA-based thin clients. Sadly, the market didn‘t eventuate, and the majority of this stock ended up on eBay, to eventually be snapped up by eager hackers. [Tom] is one of those very hackers, and decided to try some raytracing experiments with the hardware. [Tom] has one of the earlier Pano Logic clients, with VGA output and aXilinx Spartan-3E 1600 FPGA under the hood.

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Magic Wand Learns Spells through Machine Learning and an IMU

Jennifer Wang likes to dress up for cosplay and she‘s a Harry Potter fan. Her wizarding skills are technological rather than magical but to the casual observer she‘s managed to blur those lines. Having a lot of experience with different sensors, she decided to fuse all of this together to make a magic wand. The wand contains an inertial measurement unit (IMU) so it can detect gestures. Instead of hardcoding everything [Jennifer] used

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Better Mechanical Keyboards Through 3D Printing

You‘re not cool unless you have a mechanical keyboard. No, you won‘t be able to tell if your coworkers don‘t like it, because you won‘t be able to hear their complaining over the sound of your clack-clack-clacking. You can even go all-in with switch modifications, o-rings, and new springs, or you could use your 3D printer to modify the touch of your wonderful Cherry MX switches. That‘s what a few researchers did, and

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Weaponized Networked Printing is Now a Thing

It‘s a fairly safe bet that a Venn diagram of Hackaday readers and those who closely follow the careers of YouTube megastars doesn‘t have a whole lot of overlap, so you‘re forgiven if you‘re blissfully unaware of the man who calls himselfPewDiePie. As such, you may not be aware that a battle between himself and another YouTube channel which uploads Bollywood music videos has reached such a fever pitch that his fans have re

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5G Cellphone‘s Location Privacy Broken Before It‘s Even Implemented

Although hard to believe in the age of cheap IMSI-catchers, subscriber location privacy is supposed to be protected by mobile phone protocols.The Authentication and Key Agreement (AKA) protocol provides location privacy for 3G, 4G, and 5G connections, and it‘s been broken at a basic enough level that three successive generations of a technology have had some of their secrets laid bare in one fell swoop. When 3G was developed, long ago now,

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Hacking Your Way to a Custom TV Boot Screen

More and more companies are offering ways for customers to personalize their products, realizing that the increase in production cost will be more than made up for by the additional sales you‘ll net by offering a bespoke product. It‘s great for us as consumers, but unfortunately we‘ve still got a ways to go before this attitude permeates all corners of the industry. [Keegan Ryan] recently purchased a TV and wanted to replace its

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A Scratch-Built Forgotten Classic Of The Early PC Age

All the retrocomputer love for Commodore machines seems to fall on the C64 and Amiga, with a little sprinkling left over for the VIC-20. Those machines were truly wonderful, but what about the Commodore machine that paved their way? What about the machine that was one of the first to be gobbled up in the late 1970sby school districts eager to convert a broom closet into the new computer lab? The PET 2001might be a little hard to fall in love with

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Eyes On The Prize Of Glucose Monitoring

People with diabetes have to monitor their blood regularly, and this should not be a shock to anyone, but unless you are in the trenches you may not have an appreciation for exactly what that entails and how awful it can be. To give a quick idea, some diabetics risk entering a coma or shock because drawing blood is painful or impractical at the moment. The holy grail of current research is to create a continuous monitor which doesn‘t break

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