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The Science of Landing on an Asteroid

TL;DR - Very, very gently. Exploiting the resources of the rock-strewn expanse of space between Mars and the outer planets has been the stuff of science fiction for ages. There‘s gold in them thar space rocks, or diamonds, or platinum, or something that makes them attractive targets for capitalists and scientists alike. But before actually extracting the riches of the asteroid belt, stuck here as we are at the bottom of a very deep gravity

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Life Imitates Art: 3D Printed Banksy Frame ‘Shreds‘ Oeuvre, Prints Money

[Dave Buchanan] is giving the world his own take on the now famous shredding Banksy frame. This version has a few extra features though - like reverse shredding and printing money! Like many of us, [David] was impressed with the Banksy art auction shredding last week. We‘re still not sure how he pulled it off, and the jury is still out if it was real, or all some sort of stunt involving the auction house. [David] took his inspiration straig

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Performing A Chip Transplant To Resurrect A Dead Board

[Uri Shaked] accidentally touched a GPIO pin on his 3.3 V board with a 12 V alligator clip, frying the board. Sound familiar? A replacement would have cost 60, which for him wasn‘t cheap. Also, he needed it for an upcoming conference so time was of the essence. His only option was to try to fix it, which in the end involved a delicate chip transplant. The board was the Pixl.js, an LCD board with thenRF52832 SoC with its ARM Cortex M4, RAM,

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Circuit Bending A TV For Better Input

If you haven‘t noticed, CRTs are gettinghard to find. You can‘t get them in Goodwill, because thrift stores don‘t take giant tube TVs anymore. You can‘t find them on the curb set out for the trash man, because they won‘t pick them up. It‘s hard to find them on eBay, because no one wants to ship them. That‘s a shame, because the best way to enjoy old retrocomputers and game systems is with a CRT with RGB i

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Hams see Dark Side Of The Moon Without Pink Floyd

Ham radio operators bouncing signals off the moon have become old hat. But a ham radio transmitter on the Chinese Longjiang-2 satellite is orbiting the moon and has sent back pictures of the Earth and the dark side of the moon. The transceiver‘s main purpose is to allow hams to downlink telemetry and relay messages via lunar orbit. While the photo was received by the Dwingeloo radio telescope, reports are that other hams also picked up the

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Hybrid Robot Walks, Transforms, And Takes Flight

[Project Malaikat] is a 3D printed hybrid bipedal walker and quadcopter robot, but there‘s much more to it than just sticking some props and a flight controller to a biped and calling it a day. Not only is it a custom design capable of a careful but deliberate two-legged gait, but the props are tucked away and deployed on command via some impressive-looking linkages that allow it to transform from walking mode to flying mode. Creator [tang

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Wind Turbine Pushes Limits Of Desktop 3D Printing

There was a time, not so long ago, when hype for desktop 3D printing as so high that it seemed you could printanything. Just imagine it, and your handy dandy magical 3D printer couldmanifest it into reality. But now that more people have had first hand experience with the technology, the bubble has burst. Reality has sobered us up a bit, and today we‘ve got a much better idea of what can and cannot be printed on a traditional desktop 3D pri

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The Incredible Judges Of The Hackaday Prize

The last challenge of The Hackaday Prize has ended. Over the past few months, we‘ve gotten a sneak peek at over a thousand amazing projects, from Open Hardware to Human Computer Interfaces. This is a contest, though, and to decide the winner, we‘re tapping some of the greats in the hardware world to judge these astonishing projects. Below are just a preview of the judges in this year‘s Hackaday Prize. In the next few weeks, we&l

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Teardown: D50761 Aircraft Quick Access Recorder

Everyone‘s heard of the black box. Officially known as the Flight Data Recorder (FDR), it‘s a mandatory piece of equipment on commercial aircraft. The FDR is instrumental in investigating incidents or crashes, and is specifically designed to survive should the aircraft be destroyed. The search for the so-called black box often dominates the news cycle after the loss of a commercial aircraft; as finding it will almost certainly be nece

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The 3D Printed Plotter You Didn‘t Know You Needed

We‘ve been seeing an influx of repurposed 3D printers recently. Thrifty hackers have been leveraging cheap 3D printers as a way to bootstrap their builds, on everything from laser engravers to pick and place machines. There‘s nothing wrong with that, and honestly when you can get a cheap 3D printer for less than the cost of the components separately thanks to the economies of scale, you‘d be foolish not to. But there‘s sti

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Construction Cranes Versus Hurricanes

When engineers are designing buildings, bridges, or other large construction projects, a lot of thought is given to the environment. Some of these considerations might seem obvious, like designing a skyscraper in San Francisco to tolerate earthquakes, building a stadium in New York City to hold up not only its own weight but the weight of several feet of snow on the roof, or constructing bridges in any coastal area to be able to tolerate salt spr

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Shedding A Bit Of Light On Some Logic

When it comes to logic technologies, we like to think we‘ve seen them all here at Hackaday. But our community never ceases to surprise us with its variety and ingenuity, so it should be a surprise that [Dr Cockroach] has delivered one we‘ve not seen before. Light logic doesn‘t use the conventional active devices you‘d expect such as transistors, tubes, or even relays. Instead, it uses LEDs and CdS cells to make rudimentary

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Degaussing Coil To Restore Gameplay Like It‘s 1985

You may think that cathode ray tube (CRT) TVs and monitors have gone the way of the dinosaur, but you‘d be wrong. Many still have them for playing video games at home or in arcades, for vintage computing, and yes, even for watching television programs. [Nesmaniac] uses his TV for playing Super Mario Bros but for several years it had a red area in the top right corner due to a nearby lightning strike. Sadly, it stood out particularly well ag

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DIY Wire Bender Gets Wires All Bent Into Shape

It‘s been a while since we‘ve shown a DIY wire bending machine, and[How To Mechatronics] has come up with an elegant design with easy construction through the use of 3D-printed parts which handle most of the inherent complexity. This one also has a Z-axis so that you can produce 3D wire shapes. And as with all wire bending machines, it‘s fun to watch it in action, which you can do in the video below along with seeing the step-by

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Glasses For The Hearing Impaired?

If you don‘t have hearing loss, it is easy to forget just how much you depend on your ears. Hearing aids are great if you can afford them, but they aren‘t like glasses where they immediately improve your sense in almost every way. In addition to having to get used to a hearing aid you‘ll often find increased noise and even feedback. If you‘ve been to a theater lately, you may have noticed a closed caption display system so

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Hackaday Links: October 14, 2018

Here‘s something of interest of 3D printing enthusiasts. How do you printlightweight 3D objects? [Tom Stanton] does a lot of stuff with 3D printing and RC airplanes, so yeah, he‘s probably the guy you want to talk to. His solution is Simplify3D, printing two layers for whatever nozzle diameter you have, some skills with Fusion360, and some interesting design features that include integrated ribs. Moog released their first polyphonic a

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Listen To A Song Made From Custom Nintendo LABO Waveform Cards

[Hunter Irving] has been busy with the Nintendo LABO‘s piano for the Nintendo Switch. In particular he‘s been very busy creating his own custom waveform cards, which greatly expands the capabilities of the hackable cardboard contraption.If this sounds familiar, it‘s because we covered his original method of creating 3D printed waveform cards that are compatible with the piano, but he‘s taken his work further since then. No

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Synthesizing Mother Nature‘s Sounds Like You‘ve Never Seen Before

We‘ve all heard the range of sounds to be made electronically from mostly discrete components, but what [Kelly Heaton] has achieved with her many experiments is a whole other world, the world of nature to be exact. Her seemingly chaotic circuits create a nighttime symphony of frogs, crickets, and katydids, and a pleasant stroll through her Hackaday.io logs makes how she does it crystal clear and is surely as delightful as taking a nocturnal

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Flash: Arduino Vidor FPGA Instructions Hit France

If you speak French and you have an Arduino Vidor 4000, you are in luck because there‘s some good news. The good news is there‘s finally some inside information about how to configure the onboard FPGA yourself. The bad news though is that it is pretty sparse. If your high school French isn‘t up to the task, there‘s always Google Translate. We knew some of this already. You‘ll need Quartus, the FPGA design tool from A

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Detect Elevated Carbon Monoxide (Levels)

The molar mass of carbon monoxide (CO) is 28.0, and the molar mass of air is 28.8, so CO will rise in an ambient atmosphere. It makes sense to detect it farther from the ground, but getting a tall ladder is not convenient and certainly doesn‘t make for fast deployment. What do you do if you don‘t care for heights and want to know the CO levels in a gymnasium or a tall foyer? Here to save the day, is the Red Balloon Carbon Monoxide Det

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R3-14, The Personal Assistant Two Years In The Making

One of the great things about hacking together projects these days is how many powerful subsystems are readily available to reuse. [Sanjeet] took full advantage of a whole slate of reusable pieces when he built R3-14 a personal assistant robotthat you can see in action in the video below. Many people started out in electronics building something simple like a crystal radio or an LED cube. But how far could you get if your projects had to begin a

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Arcade Asteroids, Now In Colour

Asteroids is one of the classic games of the early arcade era. Launched in 1979 by Atari, it relied upon using an XY vector monitor to deliver crisp graphics for its space-based gameplay. One of the limitations of the original arcade games was that the game was only rendered in a single colour, white. Over 30 years later, [Arcade Jason] decided to see what it would take to build a color Asteroids machine. The hack relies on the fact that the orig

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Mergers And Acquisitions: Apple Buys Most of Dialog

Apple is buying a 600 million stake in Dialog Semiconductorin a deal Dialog is describing as an asset transfer and licensing deal. Dialog‘s current portfolio is focused mainly on mobile devices, withBluetooth wearables-on-a-chip,CODEC chips for smartphones, and power management ICs for every type of portable electronics. Power managment ICs are by far the most visible component, although they do have the very interesting GreenPAK, a sort of

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Dymo Rides Again With This Dot-Matrix Label Embosser

For a five-year-old future Hackaday scribe, there could be no greater day than that on which a Dymo label maker appeared in the house. With its spinny daisy-wheel to choose a character and its squeezy handle to emboss the letter into the plastic tape, there would follow a period of going nuts kerchunking out misspelled labels and slapping them on everything. Plus the things look like space guns, so there would have been a lot of pew-pewing too. T

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