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BINA-VIEW: A Fascinating Mechanical Interference Display

[Fran Blanche] tears down this fascinating display in a video teardown, embedded below. These displays can support up to 64 characters of the buyer‘s choosing which is controlled by 6 bits, surprisingly only requiring 128 mW per bit to control; pretty power-light for its day and age. Aside from alphanumeric read more

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Linux Fu: Tracing System Calls

One of the nice things about Linux and similar operating systems is that you can investigate something to any level you wish. If a program has a problem you can decompile it, debug it, trace it, and if necessary even dig into the source code for the kernel read more

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Nixie Clock Turns Boombox

With all the Nixie Clock projects out there, it is truly difficult to come up with something new and unique. Nevertheless, [TheJBW] managed to do so with his Ultimate Nixie Internet Alarm Clock (UNIAC) which definitely does not skimp on cool features. Although the device does tell time, it is read more

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3D Printering: When Resin Printing Gets Smelly

Nowadays, resin printers are highly accessible and can do some great stuff. But between isopropyl alcohol for part rinsing and the fact that some resins have a definite smell to them, ventilation can get important fast. The manufacturers don‘t talk much about this part of the resin printing experience, but read more

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Real Engineering Behind Ventilators

Experts on cognition tell us that most people think they know more than they really do. One particular indicator for that is if someone is an expert in one field and they feel like all other fields relate to theirs (everything boils down to math or chemistry or physics, for read more

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Reliability Check: Consumer and Research-Grade Wrist-Worn Heart Rate Monitors

Wearables are ubiquitous in today‘s society. Such devices have evolved in their capabilities from step counters to devices that measure calories burnt, sleep, and heart rate. It‘s pretty common to meet people using a wearable or two to track their fitness goals. However, a big question remains unanswered. How accurate read more

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Help Save The National Videogame Museum

The National Videogame Museum in Sheffield, UK, houses a unique collection celebrating all decades of video games and their culture, and as the lockdown has brought with it a crisis threatening its very existence, has launched a crowdfunding campaign with a video we‘ve placed below the break. As a relatively read more

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Compiling C to PowerPoint

If you have worked for a large company or even a small one it might seem that you spend more time writing PowerPoint charts than programming. [Tom Widenhain‘s] video asks the question: Can we compile C into PowerPoint? Watch the video below to find out the answer. Would read more

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Flexible Build Platforms Work For FDM, How About SLA?

Flexible steel sheets as the foundation for build platforms are used to great advantage in FDM 3D printers. These coated sheets are held flat by magnets during printing, and after printing is done the sheet (with print attached) can be removed and flexed to pop the prints free. This got read more

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Subwoofer Gets Arduino Brain Transplant

The Samsung PS-WTX500 subwoofer is designed to be used as part of a 5.1 channel home theater system, but not justany system. It contains the amplifiers for all the channels, but they‘ll only function when the subwoofer is connected to the matching receiver. [Alejandro Zarate] figured there must be read more

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Offline Dinosaur-Jumping Becomes a Real Workout

It‘s great to see people are out there trying to find fun ways to exercise amid the current crisis. Although jumping up and down isn‘t great for the knees, it does give decent cardio. But if you don‘t have a rope or a puddle, we admit that jumping can lose read more

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Getting To Space Is Even Harder During a Pandemic

At this point, most of us are painfully aware of the restrictions that COVID-19 social distancing protocols have put on our daily lives. Anyone who can is working from home, major events are canceled, non-essential businesses are closed, and travel is either strongly discouraged or prohibited outright. In particularly hard read more

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Brainstorming COVID-19 Hack Chat

Join us on Wednesday, April 8 at noon Pacific for the Brainstorming COVID-19 Hack Chat! The COVID-19 pandemic has been sweeping across the globe now for three months. In that time it has encountered little resistance in its advances, being a novel virus with just the right mix of transmissibility read more

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Put an Open Source Demon in Your Pocket

Back in 1996, the Tamagotchi was a triumph of hardware miniaturization. Nearly 25 years later, our expectations for commercially designed and manufactured gadgets are naturally quite a bit higher. But that doesn‘t mean we can‘t be impressed when somebody pulls off a similar feat in the DIY space. The Xling read more

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Navigating Self-Driving Cars By Looking At What‘s Underneath The Road

When you put a human driver behind the wheel, they will use primarily their eyes to navigate. Both to stay on the road and to use any navigation aids, such as maps and digital navigation assistants. For self-driving cars, tackling the latter is relatively easy, as the system would use read more

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Download A Bit Of Sinclair History

If you are a devotee of the Sinclair series of 8-bit home computers then a piece of news from the Centre For Computing History in Cambridge may be of interest to you, they‘ve released a copy of the ROM from their ZX Spectrum prototype. This machine surfaced last year as read more

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Global Status Board Keeps Eye on COVID-19 Situation

When it comes to keeping abreast of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are basically two schools of thought. Some people would rather not hear the number of confirmed cases or deaths, and just want to focus on those who recovered. That‘s fair enough. But others want to have all of the read more

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An Arduino-Free Automatic Alcohol Administrator

With all the hands-free dispenser designs cropping up out there, the maker world could potentially be headed for an Arduino shortage. We say that in jest, but it‘s far too easy to use an Arduino to prototype a design and then just leave it there doing all the work, even read more

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Harry Potter Wand Hack Makes Magic Real

Any sufficiently advanced hack is indistinguishable from magic, a wise man once observed. That‘s true with this cool build from [Jasmeet Singh] that magically opens a box when you wave a Harry Potter magic wand in the right way. Is it magic? No, it‘s a neat hack that uses computer read more

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Hackaday Links: April 5, 2020

Git is powerful, but with great power comes the ability to really bork things up. When you find yourself looking at an inscrutable error message after an ill-advised late-night commit, it can be a maximum pucker-factor moment, and keeping a clear enough head to fix the problem can be challenging. read more

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DIY Closed-Cell Silicone Foam

Most of us have a junk drawer, full of spare parts yanked from various places, but also likely stocked with materials we bought for a project but didn‘t use completely. Half a gallon of wood glue, a pile of random, scattered resistors, or in [Ken]‘s case, closed-cell silicone foam. Wanting read more

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Making an Arduino Ventilator? Read This First

Thanks to the virus crisis, lots of people are designing makeshift ventilator designs in the hopes of saving people‘s lives. Many of these are based around some sort of Arduino-powered CPU. [Armstrong Subero] things that‘s a great idea, but cautions that making an electronic pair of dice is a different read more

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Data Glove Gets a Grip On Gesture Input

If we really want wearable computing to take off as a concept, we‘re going to need lightweight input devices that can do some heavy lifting. Sure, split ergo keyboards are awesome. But it seems silly to restrict the possibilities of cyberdecks by limiting the horizons to imitations of desk-bound computing read more

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The CLUE Tracker Points You To a Target, using CircuitPython

[Jay Doscher] shares a quick GPS project he designed and completed over a weekend. The device is called the CLUE Tracker and has simple goals: it shows a user their current location, but also provides a compass heading and distance to a target point. The idea is a little like read more

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