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DIY Electric Beach Luge is a Thrill

[John Dingley] describes his Electric Beach Luge Projectas an exciting mashup between a downhill luge board, a kite surf buggy, a go-kart, and a Star Wars Land Speeder and it‘s fresh from a successful test run. What‘s not to like? The DIY experimental vehicle was made to run on long, flat, firm stretches of sand while keeping the rider as close to the ground as possible. The Beach Luge is mainly intended to be ridden while lying on on

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So, You‘ve Never Made A Spaceframe Before

It is sometimes a surprise in our community of tinkerers, builders, hackers, and makers, to find that there are other communities doing very similar things to us within their own confines, but in isolation to ours. A good example are the modified vehicle crowd. In their world there are some epic build stories and the skills and tools they take for granted would not in any way be unfamiliar to most Hackaday readers. As part of a discussion about e

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Mini Delta Gets a Hot End Upgrade

3D printers are now cheaper than ever and Monoprice is at the absolute forefront of that trend. However, some of their printers struggle with flexible filaments, which is no fun if you‘ve discovered you have a taste for the material properties of Ninjaflex and its ilk. Fear not, however the community once again has a solution, in the form of a hot end adapter for the Monoprice Mini Delta. The Mini Delta is a fantastic low-cost entry into 3

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Hackaday Prize Entry: E.R.N.I.E. Teaches Robotics and Programming

[Sebastian Goscik]‘s entry in the 2017 Hackaday Prize is a line following robot. Well, not really; the end result is a line following robot, but the actual project is about a simple, cheap robot chassis to be used in schools, clubs, and other educational, STEAM education events. Along with the chassis design comes a lesson plan allowing teachers to have a head start when presenting the kit to their students. The lesson plan is for a line-fo

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Modular Storage with Peanut Butter and Lasers

I have storage on the mind, and it comes from two facts in my life: First, I have tons of stuff in my workshop, far too much for the amount of space I have. A lot of this material is much easier to use if it‘s well-organized. Think electronics, robotics, building sets. Modular parts that need to go together a certain way for them to be useful. It is imperative, therefore, that I come up with some sort of organization system to keep the chao

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Friday Hack Chat: JavaScript on Microcontrollers

Microcontrollers today are much more powerful and much more capable than the 8051s from back in the day. Now, theyhave awesome peripherals and USB device interfaces. It‘s about time a slightly more modern language was used to program these little chips. During this Friday‘s Hack Chat, we‘re going to be talking about JavaScript on microcontrollers. [Gordon Williams] will be joining us to talk about Espruino. This is a tiny JavaSc

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Wood Finish from old Records

Next time you‘re working on a project that needs a durable wood finish, don‘t grab the polyurethane. Follow [Victor Ola‘s] advice and raid your grandparent‘s record cabinet for some old 78 records. Modern records are made from vinyl. The stiff, brittle old 78‘s from the 1960‘s and earlier were made from shellac. Shellac is a natural material secretedby the female lac bug. It can be thought of as a natural form

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Yes, Of Course Someone Shot the Eclipse on a Game Boy Camera

This one shouldn‘t surprise us, but there is something particularly enjoyable about seeing the total eclipse of the Sun through a Game Boy camera. The Game Boy got its camera accessory back in 1998 when CCD-based cameras with poor resolution were just becoming widely available to the public. This camera can capture 128112 pixel images in the four value grey scale for which the handheld is so loved. Having taken part in eclipse mania ourselv

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The Last Interesting Chrysler Had a Gas Turbine Engine

The piston engine has been the king of the transportation industry for well over a century now. It has been manufactured so much that it has become a sort of general-purpose machine that can be used to do quite a bit more than merely move people and cargo from one point to another. Running generators, hydraulic systems, pumps, and heavy machinery are but a few examples of that. Scale production of this technology also had the effect of driving pr

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Make Your Own Compound Bow from PVC Pipe

Have you ever wanted to make your own compound bow for fun or even fishing? [New creative DIY] shows us how in their YouTube video.Compound bows are very powerful in comparison to their longbow grandparents, relying on the lever principle or pulleys. meaning less power exertion for the same output. Compound bows can be really sophisticated in design using pulleys and some exotic materials, but you can make your own with a few nuts and bolts, PVC

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From Foot Pump Cylinders To Pneumatic Robot Fighting Arm

[James Bruton] is well known for making robots using electric motors but he‘s decided to try his hand at using pneumatics in order to make a fighting robot. The pneumatic cylinders will be used to give it two powerful punching arms. In true [James Bruton] fashion, he‘s started with some experiments first, using the pneumatic cylinders from foot pumps.The cylinders he‘s tried so far are taken out ofsingle cylinder foot pumps from

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Sniff Your Local LoRa Packets

As the LoRa low-bandwidth networking technology in license-free spectrum has gained traction on the wave of IoT frenzy, LoRa networks have started to appear in all sorts of unexpected places. Sometimes they are open networks such as The Things Network, other times they are commercially available networks, and then, of course, there are entirely private LoRa installations. If you are interested in using LoRa on a particular site, it‘s an int

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Yes, Of Couse Someone Shot the Eclipse on a Game Boy Camera

This one shouldn‘t surprise us, but there is something particularly enjoyable about seeing the total eclipse of the Sun through a Game Boy camera. The Game Boy got its camera accessory back in 1998 when CCD-based cameras with poor resolution were just becoming widely available to the public. This camera can capture 128112 pixel images in the four value grey scale for which the handheld is so loved. Having taken part in eclipse mania ourselv

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Someone Finally Did It With A 555

[Jarunzel] needed a device that would automatically click the left button on a mouse at a pre-set interval. For regular Hackaday readers, this is an easy challenge. You could do it with an ATtiny85 using the VUSB library, a few resistors and diodes, and a bit of code that emulates a USB device that constantly sends mouse clicks over USB every few seconds. You could also do it with a Raspberry Pi Zero, using the USB gadget protocol. Now, this mous

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Fake Ram: Identifying a Counterfeit Chip

[Robert Baruch] had something strange on his hands. He had carefully decapped74LS189164 static RAM, only to find that it wasn‘t a RAM at all. The silicon die inside the plastic package even had analog elements, which is not what one would expect to find in an SRAM. But what was it? A quick tweet brought in the cavalry, in the form of chip analysis expert [Ken Shirriff]. [Ken] immediately realized the part [Robert] had uncovered wasn‘t

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Hackaday Prize Entry: Staircane, a Walker That Takes the Stairs

[Jim]‘s aunt has lived in the same house for the last 50 years. She loves it there, and she wants to stay as long as possible. There‘s a big problem, though. The house has several staircases, and they are all beginning to disagree with her. Enter Staircane, [Jim]‘s elegant solution that adds extendable legs to any standard walker. Most of the time, walkers serve their purpose quite well. But once you encounter uneven ground or a

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How Peptides Are Made

What does body building, anti-aging cream and Bleomycin (a cancer drug) have in common? Peptides of course! Peptides are large molecules that are vital to life. If you were to take a protein and break it into smaller pieces, each piece would be called a peptide. Just like proteins, peptides are made of amino acids linked together in a chain-like structure. Whenever you ingest a protein, your body breaks it down to its individual amino acids. It t

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ESP8266 Based Internet Radio Receiver is Packed with Features

Have a beautiful antique radio that‘s beyond repair? This ESP8266 based Internet radio by [Edzelf] would be an excellent starting point to get it running again, as an alternative to a Raspberry-Pi based design. The basic premise is straightforward: an ESP8266 handles the connection to an Internet radio station of your choice, and a VS1053 codec module decodes the stream to produce an audio signal (which will require some form of amplificati

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The Enigma Enigma: How The Enigma Machine Worked

To many, the Enigma machine is an enigma. But it‘s really quite simple.The following is a step-by-step explanation of how it works, fromthe basics to the full machine. Possibly the greatest dedicated cipher machine in human history the Enigma machine is a typewriter-sized machine, with keyboard included, that the Germans used to encrypt and decrypt messages during World War II.It‘s also one of the machines that the Polish Cipher Burea

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Self-Playing Violin: Eighth Wonder Of The World

[Martin], of the YouTube channel [WinterGatan], recently uploaded a video tour of thePhonoliszt Violina, an orchestrion, or a machine that plays music that sounds as though an orchestra is playing. The interesting thing about this one is that it plays the violin. At the time of its construction, people weren‘t even certain such a thing would be possible and so when [Ludwig Hupfeld] first built one around 1910, it was considered the eighth w

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Laser Etching PCBs

A while ago, [Marco] mounted a powerful laser diode to a CNC machine in an attempt to etch copper clad board and create a few PCBs. The results weren‘t that great, but the technique was promising. In a new experiment, [Marco] purchased a very cheap laser engraver kit from China, and now this technique looks like it might be a winner. [Marco] sourced his laser engraver from Banggood, and it‘s pretty much exactly what you would expect f

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Electric Longboard with All-New Everything

We love [lolomolo]‘s Open Sourceelectric longboard project. Why? Because he completely re-engineered everything while working on the project all through college. He tackled each challenge, be it electronic or mechanical as it came, and ended up making everything himself. The 48 x 13 deck is a rather unique construction utilizing carbon fiber and Baltic birch. In testing the deck, [lolomol] found the deflection was less than an inch with 500

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A Detailed Guide for 3D Printing Enclosures

We‘ve all have projects that are done, but not complete. They work, but they‘re just a few PCBs wired together precariously on our desks. But fear not! A true maker‘s blog has gifted us with a detailed step-by-step guide on how to make a project enclosure. Having purchased an MP Select Mini 3D Printer, there was little to do but find something practical to print. What better than an enclosure for a recently finished Time/Date/Te

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Open Source Modular Rocket Avionics Package

Cambridge postgraduate student[Adam Greig] helped design a rocket avionics system consisting of a series of disc-shaped PCBs arranged in a stack. There‘s a lot that went into the system and you can get a good look at it all through the flickr album. Built with the help of Cambridge University Spaceflight, the Martlet is a 3-staging sounding rocket that lifts to 15km/50K feet on Cesaroni Pro98 engines. [Adam]‘s control system uses seve

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