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LoRa With The ESP32

If you are interested in deploying LoRa the low power long-range wireless technology you might enjoy [Rui Santos‘] project and video about using the ESP32 with the Arduino IDE to implement LoRa. You can see the video below. He uses the RFM95 transceivers with a breakout board, so even if you want to use a different processor, you‘ll still find a lot of good information. In fact, the video is just background on LoRa that doesn‘

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An Artsy and Functional LED Filament Lamp

Some projects end up being more objet d‘art than objet d‘utile, and we‘re fine with that hacks can be beautiful too. Some hacks manage both, though, like this study in silicon and gallium under glass that serves as a bright and beautiful desk lamp. There‘s no accounting for taste, of course, but we really like the way[commanderkull]‘s LED filament lamp turned out, and it‘s obvious that a fair amount of work we

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Modular Robotics That Can Make Themselves Into Anything

The greatest challenge of robotics is autonomy. Usually, this means cars that can drive themselves, a robotic vacuum that won‘t drive down the stairs, or a rover on Mars that can drive on Mars. This project is nothing like that. Instead of building a robot with a single shape, this robot is made out of several modules that can self-assemble into different structures. It‘s an organized fleet of robots, all helping each other, like an a

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Walking Through MRIs With A Vive

If you were to make a list of the most important technological achievements of the last 100 years, advanced medical imaging would probably have to rank right up near the top. The ability to see inside the body in exquisite detail is nearly miraculous, and in some cases life-saving. Navigating through the virtual bodies generated by the torrents of data streaming out of something like a magnetic resonance imager (MRI) can be a challenge, though. T

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E-Dermis: Feeling At Your (Prosthetic) Fingertips

When we lose a limb, the brain is really none the wiser. It continues to send signals out, but since they no longer have a destination, the person is stuck with one-way communication and a phantom-limb feeling. The fact that the brain carries on has always been promising as far as prostheses are concerned, because it means the electrical signals could potentially be used to control new limbs and digits the natural way. It‘s also good news f

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Laser Draws Weather Report

Have you ever wished that a laser could tell you the weather? If you have, then [tuckershannon] has you covered. He‘s created a machine that uses a laser and some UV sensitive paper to draw the temperature and a weather icon! And that‘s not all! It‘s connected to the internet, so it can also show the time and print out messages. Building on [tuckershannon]‘s previous work with glow-in-the-dark drawing, the brains inside th

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Is This The World‘s Smallest Computer?

How small could you make a computer? In a way, that‘s a question that requires that a computer be defined, because you could measure the smallest computer simply in terms of the smallest area of silicon required to create a microprocessor. So perhaps it‘s better to talk about a smallestworking computer. Recent entries in the race for the smallest machine have defined a computer as a complete computer system which holds onto its progra

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Roll Your Own Trackball Mouse

What do you do when you‘re into trackball mice, but nothing out there is affordable or meets all your murine needs? You build one, of course. And if you‘re like [Dangerously Explosive], who has a bunch of old optical mice squeaking around the shop, you can mix and match them to build the perfect one. The mouse, which looks frozen mid-transformation into a rodential assassin, is a customized work of utilitarian art. Despite the excelle

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ROPS Will Be The Board x86 Robot Builders Are Waiting For

If your robot has outgrown a Raspberry Pi and only the raw computing power of an x86 motherboard will suffice, you are likely to encounter a problem with its interfaces. The days of ISA cards are long gone, and a modern PC is not designed to easily talk to noisy robot hardware. Accessible ports such as USB can have interfaces connected to them, but suffer from significant latency in the process. A solution comes from ROPS, or Robot on a PCI-e Sti

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Arduino and Pidgin C++

What do you program the Arduino in? C? Actually, the Arduino‘s byzantine build processes uses C++. All the features you get from the normal libraries are actually C++ classes. The problem is many people write C and ignore the C++ features other than using object already made for them. Just like traders often used pidgin English as a simplified language to talk to non-English speakers, many Arduino coders use pidgin C++ to effectively code C

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Digitizing Domesday Disks

After the Norman invasion of England, William the Conqueror ordered a great reckoning of all the lands and assets owned. Tax assessors went out into the country, counted sheep and chickens, and compiled everything into one great tome. This was the Domesday Book, an accounting of everything owned in England nearly 1000 years ago. It is a vital source for historians and economists, and one of the most important texts of the Middle Ages. In the earl

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A MIDI Sequencer To Be Proud Of

MIDI sequencers are surprisingly expensive, making them an excellent target for [RH Electronics] who has created a sixteen-step device. It supports up to eight playable parts per step, which can be either MIDI or drum triggers. The case and front panel are built to a very high standard, and on a piece of stripboard within lies an ATmega644 which does all the MIDI work, an ATmega328 that runs the many LEDs, and an ATtiny85 that reads the front pan

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A Cleverly Concealed Magnetic Loop Antenna

We‘re sure all radio amateurs must have encountered the problem faced by[Alexandre Grimberg PY1AHD] frequently enough that they nod their heads sagely. There you are, relaxing in the sun on the lounger next to the crystal-blue pool, and you fancy working a bit of DX. But the sheer horror of it all, a tower, rotator, and HF Yagi would ruin the aesthetic, so what can be done? [Alexandre]‘s solution is simple and elegant: conceal a circu

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TerraDome Gives Plants And Dinosaurs A New Home

Housing exotic plants or animals offer a great opportunity to get into the world of electronic automation. When temperature, light, and humidity ranges are crucial, sensors are your best friend. And if woodworking and other types of crafts are your thing on top, why not build it all from scratch. [MagicManu] did so with his Jurassic Park themed octagonal dome built from MDF and transparent polystyrene. With the intention to house some exotic plan

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Your Own Sinclair Scientific Calculator

We‘ve talked about the Sinclair scientific calculator before many times, and for some of us it was our first scientific calculator. If you can‘t find yours or you never had one, now you can build your own using what else an Arduino thanks to [Arduino Enigma]. There‘s a video, below and the project‘s homepage on Hackaday.io describes it all perfectly: The original chip inside the Sinclair Scientific Calculator was reverse

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The History and Physics of Triode Vacuum Tubes

The triode vacuum tube might be nearly obsolete today, but it was a technology critical to making radio practical over 100 years ago. [Kathy] has put together a video that tells the story and explains the physics of the device. The first radio receivers used a device called a Coherer as a detector, relying on two tiny filaments that would stick together when RF was applied, allowing current to pass through. It was a device that worked, but not re

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Linear Track Makes Plasma Cuts Neat And Simple

No microcontroller, no display, and not even an LED in sight. That‘s how[Made in Poland] decided to roll with this motorized linear plasma cutter, and despite the simplicity it really gets the job done when there‘s metal to be cut. Plasma cutting makes slicing and dicing heavy stock a quick job, but it‘s easy to go off course with the torch or to vary the speed and end up with a poor edge. This tool takes the shakes out of the e

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Evolving the 3D Printed Linear Actuator

Our open source community invites anyone with an idea to build upon the works of those who came before. Many of us have encountered a need to control linear motion and adapted an inexpensive hobby servo for the task. [Michael Graham] evaluated existing designs and believed he has ideas to advance the state of the art. Our Hackaday Prize judges agreed, placing his3D Printed Servo Linear Actuator as one of twenty winners of our Robotics Module Chal

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VCF East XIII: Another Day in Retro Paradise

While the weather alternated between mist and monsoon for most of it, the thirteenth annual Vintage Computer Festival East was still a huge success. People came from all over the country, and indeed the world, to show off computers and equipment that was easily older than many of those in attendance. From 1980‘s robots to recreations of the very first machines to ever carry the name computer as we understand it today, there were a dizzying

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Beats an Extension Cord

What does your benchtop power supply have that [Pete Marchetto]‘s does not? Answer: an extension cord draped across the floor. How often have you said to yourself, I just need to energize this doodad for a couple seconds, then you start daisy chaining every battery in the junk drawer to reach the necessary voltage? It is not uncommon to see battery packs with a single voltage output, but [Pete] could not find an adjustable one, so he built

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There‘s RC2014 Life In The TMS9918A Display Chip Yet

One of the outliers in the home computer wars of the early 1980s was the Texas Instruments TI99/4A. It may not have had the games library of its rivals and its TMS9900 processor may not have set the world on fire with its registers-in-RAM architecture, but its range of support chips included one whose derivatives would go on to delight subsequent generations. If you had an MSX or one of the 8 or 16-bit Sega consoles, the TMS9918A graphics chip pr

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Linux Fu: The Great Power of Make

Over the years, Linux (well, the operating system that is commonly known as Linux which is the Linux kernel and the GNU tools) has become much more complicated than its Unix roots. That‘s inevitable, of course. However, it means old-timers get to slowly grow into new features while new people have to learn all in one gulp. A good example of this is how software is typically built on a Linux system. Fundamentally, most projects use make a p

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When Vortex Rings Collide

Intrigued by a grainy video from 1992, [Destin] from Smarter Every Day decided to jump in and fund his own research into the strange phenomenon of vortex ring collisions. This hack started with a scientific publication and a video from back in 1992. The paper, written by Dr. T T Lim and TB Nichols, illustrated what happens when two vortex rings collide perfectly head-on. The rings collide and spread out forming a thin membrane. Then smaller rings

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Analog Meters Become a Clock for Father‘s Day

Around Father‘s Day each year, we usually see a small spate of dad-oriented projects. Some are projects by dads or granddads for the kids, while others are gifts for the big guy. This analog meter clock fits the latter category, with the extra bonus of recognizing and honoring the influence [Micheal Teeuw]‘s father had on him with all things technological. [Michael] had been mulling over a voltmeter clock, where hours, minutes and sec

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