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Amiga Gets a PS/2 Keyboard Port

Name anyretrocomputer Apple II, Sinclair, even TRS-80s and you‘ll find a community that‘s deeply committed to keeping it alive and kicking. It‘s hard to say which platform has the most rabid fans, but we‘d guess Commodore is right up there, and the Amiga aficionados seem particularly devoted. Which is where this Amiga PS/2 mouse port comes from. The Amiga was a machine that was so far ahead of its time that people just di

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The Nixie Tube Killer That Never Was

With the wealth of Nixie projects out there, there are points at which Hackaday is at risk of becoming Nixieaday. Nixie clocks, Nixie calculators, Nixie weather stations, and Nixie power meters have all graced our pages. And with good reason - Nixie tubes have a great retro look, and the skills needed to build a driver are a cut above calculating the right value for a series resistor for an LED display. But not everyone loved Nixies back in the d

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FoTW: LED Strips Make Awful Servo Drivers

We must all have at some time or another spotted a hack that seems like an incredible idea and which justhas to be tried, but turns out to have been stretching the bounds of what is possible just alittle too far. A chunk of our time has disappeared without trace, and we sheepishly end up buying the proper part for the job in hand. [Orionrobots] had a conversation with a YouTube follower about LED strips. An LED strip contains a length of ready-ma

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Scratch Built Watch Case is a Work Of Art

The wristwatch was once an absolute necessity, as much fashion statement as it was a practical piece of equipment. Phones in our pockets (and more often than not, in our faces) replaced the necessity of the wristwatch for the majority of people, and the fashion half of the equation really only interests a relatively small subset of the population. The end result is that, aside from the recent emergence of smartwatches and fitness trackers, walkin

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Quick Hack Helps ALS Patient Communicate

A diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, is devastating. Outlier cases like [Stephen Hawking] notwithstanding, most ALS patients die within four years or so of their diagnosis, after having endured the progressive loss of muscle control that robs them of their ability to walk, to swallow, and even to speak. Rather than see a friend‘s father locked in by his ALS,[Ricardo Andere de Mello] decided to help out by building a one-fin

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Hackaday Prize Entry: Pyrotechnics Sequencer with Wireless Control

[visualkev]‘s friend was putting on his own fireworks show by lighting each one in turn, then running away. It occurred to [visualkev] that his friend wasn‘t really enjoying the show himself because he was ducking for cover instead of watching the fun. Plus, it was kind of dangerous. Accordingly, he applied his hacker skills to the challenge by creating a custom fireworks sequencer. He used a custom PCB from OSH Park with an ATMega328

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Books You Should Read: The Cuckoo‘s Egg

The mid-1980s were a time of drastic change. In the United States, the Reagan era was winding down, the Cold War was heating up, and the IBM PC was the newest of newnesses. The comparatively few wires stitchingtogether the larger university research centers around the world pulsed with a new heartbeat the Internet Protocol (IP) and while the World Wide Web was still a decade or so away, The Internet was a real place for a growing number of comp

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Enlarged Miniature Forklift

How do you classify something that is gigantic and miniature at the same time? LEGO kit 850, from 1977 when it was known as an Expert Builder set, was 210 modular blocks meant to be transformed into a forklift nearly 140mm tall. [Matt Denton] scaled up the miniature pieces but it still produced a smaller-than-life forklift. This is somewhere in the creamy middle because his eight-year-old nephew can sit on it but most adults would demolish their

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Spy Tech: Stealing a Moon Probe

Ever hear of the Soviet Luna program? In the west, it was often called Lunik, if you heard about it at all. Luna was a series of unmanned moon probes launched between 1959 and 1976. There were at least 24 of them, and 15 were successful. Most of the failures were not reported or named. Luna craft have a number of firsts, but the one we are interested in is that it may have been the first space vehicle to be stolen at least temporarily in a cold

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DIY 9V Battery

Volta‘s pile the first battery was little more than silver and zinc discs separated by paper soaked in salt water. A classic classroom experiment is to build a pile from copper pennies, tin foil, and vinegar or lemon juice. [Omars2] has a different take on this old experiment. He creates a 9V battery using some zinc screws, copper wire, and salt water. There‘s a video of the battery, below. A syringe piston serves as a substrate for

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Cheap RC Truck Mod Is Slightly Risky Fun

The world of RC can be neatly split into two separate groups: models and toys. The RC models are generally big, complex, and as you‘d imagine, more expensive. On the other hand, the RC toys are cheap and readily available. While not as powerful or capable as their more expensive siblings, they can often be a lot of fun; especially since the lower costs means a crash doesn‘t put too big of a ding into to your wallet. With his latest mo

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A Web-Based Modem

If you are beyond a certain age, you will recall when getting on the Internet was preceded by strange buzzing and squawking noises. Modems used tones to transmit and receive data across ordinary telephone lines. There were lots of tricks used to keep edging the speed of modem up until at the end you could download (but not upload) at a blazing 56,000 bits per second. [Martin Kirkholt Melhus] decided to recreate a modem. In a Web browser. No kid

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Motion Activated Super-Squirter Stands Guard

Thieves beware. If you prowl around [Matthew Gaber]‘s place, you get soaked by his motion activated super-squirter. Even if he‘s not at home, he can aim and fire it remotely using an iPhone app. And for the record, a camera saves photos of your wetted-self to an SD card. The whole security system is handled by three subsystems for target acquisition, photo documentation, and communications.The first subsystem is centered around an ESP

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Hassle-Free Classical Conditioning for Honey Bees

When you‘re sick or have a headache, you tend to see things a bit differently. An ill-feeling human will display a cognitive bias and expect the world to punish them further. The same is true of honey bees. They are intelligent creatures that exhibit a variety of life skills, such as decision-making and learning. It was proven back in 2011 that honey bees will make more pessimistic decisions after being shaken in a way that simulates an att

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Exploiting Weak Crypto on Car Key Fobs

[tomwimmenhove] has found a vulnerability in the cryptographic algorithm that is used by certain Subaru key fobs and he has open-sourced the software that drives this exploit. All you need to open your Subaru is a RasPi and a DVB-T dongle, so you could complain that sharing this software equates to giving out master keys to potential car thieves. On the other hand, this only works for a limited number of older models from a single manufacturer i

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Hackaday Prize Entry: Unlock Your PC The RFID Way

Sometimes we see projects whose name describes very well what is being achieved, without conveying the extra useful dimension they also deliver. So it is with [Prasanth KS]‘sWindows PC Lock/Unlock Using RFID. On the face of it this is a project for unlocking a Windows PC, but when you sit down and read through it you discover a rather useful primer for complete RFID newbies on how to put together an RFID project. Even the target doesn&lsquo

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Retrotechtacular: Weather Station Kurt

Sometimes when researching one Hackaday story we as writers stumble upon the one train of thought that leads to another. So it was with a recent look at an unmanned weather station buoy from the 1960s, which took us on a link to a much earlier automated weather station. Weather Station Kurt was the only successful installation among a bold attempt by the German military during the Second World War to gain automated real-time meteorological data f

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Friday Hack Chat: Energy Harvesting

Think about an Internet-connected device that never needs charging, never plugs into an outlet, and will never run out of power. With just a small solar cell, an Internet of Thing module can run for decades. This is the promise of energy harvesting, and it opens the doors to a lot of interesting questions. Joining us for this week‘s Hack Chat will be [John Tillema], CTO and co-founder of TWTG. They‘re working on removing batteries com

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About That Giant Robot Battle Last Night

Two years ago we wrote about a giant robot battle between the USA and Japan. After two years in the making, MegaBots (team USA) and Suidobashi (team Japan) were finally ready for the first giant robot fight. If you are into battle bots, you probably did not miss the fight that happened around 7:00 pm PST. If you missed it, you can watch the whole thing here. There were two duels. First it was Iron Glory (MkII) vs. Kuratas, and after that it was E

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Practical Public Key Cryptography

Encryption is one of the pillars of modern-day communications. You have devices that use encryption all the time, even if you are not aware of it. There are so many applications and systems using it that it‘s hard to begin enumerating them. Ranging from satellite television to your mobile phone, from smart power meters to your car keys, from your wireless router to your browser, and from your Visa to your Bitcoins the list is endless. One o

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Rescuing An Antique Saw Set

Who doesn‘t like old tools? Even if they aren‘t practical to use for production, plenty of old tools still have a life to offer the hobbyistor home worker. Some tools might seem a bit too far gone - due to age, rust, or practicality, to use. That‘s where [Hand Tool Rescue] comes in. [HTR] finds rusty, dirty old tools, and brings them back to life. Sometimes they‘re practical tools, other times, they‘re a bit out ther

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Testing Brushless Motors with a Scope (or a Meter)

Brushless motors have a lot of advantages over traditional brushed motors. However, testing them can be a bit of a pain. Because the resistance of the motor‘s coils is usually very low, a standard resistance check isn‘t likely to be useful. Some people use LC meters, but those aren‘t as common as a multimeter or oscilloscope. [Nils Rohwer] put out two videos one two years ago and one recently showing how to test a brushless mo

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Control System Fundamentals by Video

If you‘ve had the classic engineering education, you probably have a hazy recollection of someone talking about control theory. If you haven‘t, you‘ve probably at least heard of PID controllers and open loop vs closed loop control. If you don‘t know about control theory or even if you just want a refresher, [Brian Douglas] has an excellent set of nearly 50 video lectures that will give you a great introduction to the topic

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Sacrificial Bridge Avoids 3D Printed Supports

[Tommy] shares a simple 3D printing design tip that will be self-evident to some, but a bit of a revelation to others: the concept of a sacrificial bridge to avoid awkward support structures. In the picture shown, the black 3D print has small bridges and each bridge has a hole. The purpose of these bits is to hold a hex nut captive in the area under the bridge; a bolt goes in through the round hole in the top. Readers familiar with 3D printing wi

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