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Radio Apocalypse: The Emergency Broadcast System

Some sounds are capable of evoking instant terror. It might be the shriek of a mountain lion, or a sudden clap of thunder. Whatever your trigger sound, it instantly stimulates something deep in the lizard brain that says: get ready, danger is at hand. For my part, you can‘t get much scarier than the instantly recognizable two-tone alert signal(audio link warning) from the Emergency Broadcast System (EBS). For anyone who grew up watching TV

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Super Low Tech Mario

Browsing around the depths of the Internet we came across a super low tech version of Super Mario from [Sata Productions]. The video presents a complete tutorial on how to make a playable, cardboard version of the famous Super Mario game. If you are a fan, you probably going to like this. You basically need cardboard, a hot glue gun, a ball bearing, a couple of DC motors, some iron BBs, some magnets, batteries, some wires it sounds just like shop

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The Hacker Village of Supercon

I‘m utterly exhausted and still in a state of awe. The Hackaday Superconference has grown in so many ways, but one thing remains the same: the spirit of the Hacker Village an intangible feeling that grows up around all who attend is bliss to take part in. There‘s really no substitute for having been there in person. I‘ll go into detail below and try to share the experience as best I can. But the gist of the atmosphere is this:

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Your Drone Is Cool, But It‘s No Jet Fighter

There are some communities with whom our happy band of hardware hackers share a lot in common, but with whom we don‘t often associate. The more workshop-orientated end of the car modification or railway modeler scenes, for instance, or the model aircraft fraternity. Many of these communities exist more for the activity than for the making, some of them dabble with building kits, but among them are a hard core of people who create amazing pr

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Hacking An Industrial 42 Multitouch PC

We‘re slowly moving in the direction where everyone will have a touch screen desk like in the 1982 TRON movie or in the 1987 Star Trek: The Next Generation series with its ubiquitous touchscreen starship controls.[FFcossag] lucked into that future when a local company offered him an industrial 42 multitouch PC that they were throwing out. A few hacks later and he has us all suitably envious. Before hacking away though, he had to take care o

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Surprise Your Loved One with a Heart Keychain

Sometimes the simplest projects can be the most impressive. Most of the time our simple projects are not as neat and elegant as our more time consuming ones. Sometimes they don‘t even leave the breadboard! When [Sasa Karanovic] first envisioned his key-chain idea, he knew it would be simple. But he made up for the lack of sophistication with style. The heart-shaped key-chain has one goal - to flash a pair of red LEDs when a capacitive butto

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IoT Garage Door Opener from Scrap

[Hans Nielsen] has a couple roommates, and his garage has become a catch-all for various items. And like any good hacker‘s garage, it boasts an IoT controlled garage door opener. It had a problem though, it used a Particle Photon - a popular IoT board that required internet access and a web server to operate. So [Hans] raided he roommate‘s spare parts bin and set-forth to rebuild it! One of his main goals was to make something that di

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NODECONF EU HACKABLE BADGE

During conferences, a name-tag is one of the first things people look at when bumping in to others - mentally trying to keep track of faces and names. But gone are the days when your name tag was a post-it stuck on your arm. Over the years, conference badges have become increasingly interesting and complex. Hackable electronic badges are becoming the norm, and not just at hardware cons. For the recently concluded NodeConfEU conference in Ireland,

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Bluetooth Photo Booth Gets Vetting at Wedding

With just two weeks to go before his friends‘ wedding, [gistnoesis] built a well-featured robotic photo booth. Using a Bluetooth PS3 controller, guests could move the camera around, take a picture, style it in one of several ways (or not), and print it out with a single button press. The camera is mounted on a DIY 2-axis gimbal made from extruded aluminium and 3D-printed parts. It can be moved left/right with one joystick, and up/down with

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LEDs Give HP 3457A DDM‘s LCD Display the Boot

Have you ever been so frustrated with a digital display that you wanted to rip the whole thing out and create a better one? That is exactly what [xi] did. Replacing their constantly used HP 3457A multimeter‘s LCD display with a brighter LED onewas a necessary project and a stress reducing one at that. While this digital multimeter is well-known for its reliability, its standard display is rather lacking. In fact, there are several mods alr

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The Perils of Developing the Hackaday Superconference Badge

In case you haven‘t heard, the best hardware conference in the world was last weekend. TheHackaday Superconferencewas three days of hardware hacking, soldering irons, and an epic hardware badge. Throw in two stages for talk, two workshop areas, the amazing hallwaycon and the best, most chill attendees you can imagine, and you have the ultimate hardware conference. Already we‘ve gone over the gory details of what this badge does, and n

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Friday Hack Chat: High Speed Data Acquisition

For this week‘s Hack Chat, we‘re going to be talking all about High-Speed Data Acquisition. If you‘ve ever needed to shove voltages, currents, logic signals, temperature, pressure, or sound into a computer, you‘ve used a DAQ. If you‘ve ever needed to acquire a signal at a very high speed, you‘ve probably paid a lot of money for that piece of equipment. Our guest for this week‘s Hack Chat will be [Kumar Ab

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Rewire Your Own Brushless Motors

Hackaday likes the idea of fine-tuning existing hardware rather than buying new stuff. [fishpepper] wrote upa tutorial on rewinding brushless motors,using the Racerstar BR1103B as the example. The BR1103B comes in 8000 Kv and 10000 Kv sizes, but [fishpepper] wanted to rewind the stock motor and make 6500 Kv and 4500 Kv varieties or as close to it as he could get. Kv is the ratio of the motor‘s RPM to the voltage that‘s required to ge

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Visual 3D Print Finishing Guide

With 3D printers now dropping to record low prices, more and more people are getting on the additive manufacturing bandwagon. As a long time believer in consumer-level desktop 3D printing, this is a very exciting time for me; the creativity coming out of places like Thingiverse or the 3D printing communities on Reddit is absolutely incredible. But the realist in me knows that despite what slick promotional material from the manufacturers may lead

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Homebrew SNES Mini Aims for Historical Accuracy

While normies are out fighting in the isles of Walmart to snap up one of the official Classic Mini consoles that Nintendo lets slip out onto the market every once and awhile, hackers have been perfecting their own miniature versions of these classic gaming systems. The Classic Mini line is admittedly a very cool way to capitalize on nostalgic masses who have now found themselves at the age where they have disposable income, but the value proposit

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Automated Chamber Passes Just the Right Gas

It sounds like an overly complicated method a supervillain would use to slowly and painfully eliminate enemies a chamber with variable oxygen concentration. This automated environmental chamber isn‘t for torturing suave MI6 agents, though; rather, it enables cancer research more-or-less on the cheap. Tasked with building something to let his lab simulate the variable oxygen microenvironments found in some kinds of tumors,[RyanM415] first c

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This Weekend: Vintage Computer Festival Zurich

This weekend, November 18th and 19th, the greatest vintage computer conference in Europe is going down. It‘s the Vintage Computer Festival Europe, and if you‘re around Zurich this weekend, we highly recommend that you check it out. On deck for this year‘s VCF Europe is an incredible amount of amazing retrotechnology. A demonstration of high-resolution graphics without using computer memory will be found in a few Tektronix storag

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Build one, get two: CPLD and STM32 development on a single board

Programmable logic devices have claimed their place in the hobbyist world, with more and more projects showing up that feature either a CPLD or their bigger sibling, the FPGA. That place is rightfully earned creating your own, custom digital circuitry not only adds flexibility, but opens up a whole new world of opportunities. However, this new realm can be overwhelming and scary at the same time.A great way to ease into this is combining the pro

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If You Want to Spend on a Microscope

A quick check of the usual Chinese websites will yield USB microscopes for a very low price. However, many of these are little more than webcams with some cheap optics. Not that they can‘t be useful, but they probably won‘t compete with an expensive instrument like a Dino-Lite. [Shahriar] looks at the latest offerings from Dino-Lite and shows how they can be useful when examining electronics. You can see the video below, but be warned

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A Dreamcast VMU With A Secret

Since the Raspberry Pi range of boards first appeared back in 2012, we‘ve seen them cleverly integrated into a host of inventive form factors. Today we bring you the latest offering in this space, [Kite]‘s Raspberry Pi Zero W installed in the case of a Sega Dreamcast VMU. The result is a particularly nicely executed build in which the Pi with a few of its more bulky components removed or replaced with low-profile alternatives sits on

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Less Than Production, More than One-Offs

We build things we think are cool. Sometimes, other people agree with us and they want a copy of what we‘ve built. If you‘re lucky enough to have an enviable product but you‘re not ready for full-scale manufacturing, you may be looking at a low-volume production run. [Eric Strebel] walks us through one such instance where he makes some custom color swatches for a show. Video after the break. [Eric Strebel] is an industrial desig

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High Speed Chronograph Looks Like Pro Gear

It can be hard enough to take a good photograph of a running kid or pet, and if we‘re being honest, sometimes even stationary objects manage to allude our focus. Now imagine trying to take a picture of something movingreally fast, like a bullet. Trying to capture the moment a fast moving projectile hits an object is simply not possible with a human behind the shutter button. Enter the ballistic chronometer: a device that uses a set of senso

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Maria Goeppert-Mayer: The Other Nobel Prize Winner

Maria Goeppert-Mayer was one of only two women to win the Nobelprize for physics thus far, the other being Marie Curie. And yet hername isn‘t anywhere near as well known as Marie Curie‘s. Shealso worked on the Manhattan Project and spent time during herlong career with Enrico Fermi, Max Born, Edward Teller, and many other physics luminaries. She was other in another way too. She followed her husband from university to university, and

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UV Sensitive Filament As A Persistent Display

Some of the hacks we feature are modifications of existing devices, others are ground-up builds of entirely new ones. And then there are the experiments, things that have to be worth trying because they just might work. In this final category we have [Matt]‘s work with UV sensitive plastic to form the basis of a simple persistent display, which has created something best described as a proof-of-concept that shows promise, and definitely pro

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