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Building A Motorized Barrel Boat

[Rinoa Super-Genius] shows us in a video how to build a crude motorized barrel boatusing only a few parts, including pontoons for extra buoyancy and stabilisation. Building a barrel boat is simple. All you really need is a plastic barrel, scrap wood, PVC pipe with end caps, a battery, and a trolling motor. Of course, you could go even further and build your own trolling motor too. The video shows the process of building the boat. You start of by

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DIY Dual Extrusion

Dual extrusion 3D printers are not as uncommon as they used to be, but there are still a lot of single-extruder machines. [Paul Lang] wanted to refit his printer to take two MK8 extruders, and he documented his experience with a blog postthat has a few good tips if you want to try it yourself. [Paul] used Fusion 360 to design a holder for the extruders that would fit his printer. Since he had accidentally ordered a spool of pink PLA, the whole as

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Smart Speed Bumps Slow Only Speeding Cars

Like it or not speed bumps are an essential part of our road infrastructure especially in built-up places like near schools [Business Insider UK] reportsnon-Newtonian liquid filled speed bumpsare being tested in Spain, Israel and Germany. Traditional speed bumps do have their drawbacks; damage to the underside of low vehicles is common. While they should be uniform in dimensions, in practice they can vary significantly, making driving over unfami

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Hackaday Prize Entry: Smart Composting System

Composting serves an important purpose in our society, reusing our food scraps and yard waste to fertilize gardens rather than fill up landfills. Knowing that most people don‘t compost, [Darian Johnson] set out to create a Arduino-controlled composting system to make it as simple as possible. It monitors your bin‘s moisture, temperature, and gas emissions to ensure it‘s properly watered and aerated. [Darian]‘s projectcombi

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Hands On With The SHACamp 2017 Badge

The badge has become one of the defining features of a modern hacker camp, a wearable electronic device that serves as both event computer and platform for some mild software and hardware hacking. Some events have had astoundingly sophisticated badges while others are more simple affairs, and the phenomenon has even spawned an ecosystem of unofficial badges which have nothing to do with the event in question. The SHACamp 2017 badge is the latest

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Building An Ultralight Out Of Foam In A Basement

[Peter Sripol] is something of a legend in the DIY RC aircraft crowd. He‘s friends with Flite Test, and there he built an enormous RC cargo plane that could easily carry a small child aloft. Now, [Peter] is aiming a bit higher. He‘s building an ultralight amanned ultralight in his basement. It‘s made out of insulation foam. Yes, this ultralight is constructed out of insulation foam, but you can think of that as just a skin. Th

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Bibles You Should Read: PoC || GTFO

PASTOR LAPHROAIG ANNOUNCES THE PUBLICATION OF WHAT WILL TORMENT THE ACOLYTES OF THE CHURCH OF ROBOTRON! NO MAN SHALL BE SPARED AND THE INQUISITION WILL BEGIN PROMPTLY! For the last few years, Pastor Manul Laphroaig and friends have been publishing the International Journal of PoC GTFO. This is a collection of papers and exploits, submitted to the Tract Association of PoC GTFO, each of which demonstrates an interesting exploit, technique, or sof

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From Handheld Bandsaw To Shop Bandsaw

If you grow up around a workshop then the chances are that you‘ll have the most respect for saws. Formative years being constantly warned by parents about their risks leave an indelible mark on the nascent maker, and leave them visibly less cavalier on the matter than for example other hackspace members.The fact remains that saws offer some of the most ready opportunities for danger in your workshop. But which are the least hazardous? In th

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Filaween 2.0 is Go

[Thomas Sanladerer] is at it again: testing all of the 3D-printer filaments that are fit to print (with). And this year, he‘s got a new and improved testing methodology video embedded below. And have a search for filaween2 to see what he‘s reviewed so far. There‘s some sexy filaments in there. We really love the brand-new impact strength test, where a hammer is swung on a pivot (3D printed, natch), breaks through the part under

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A Tale Of Two Raft Races

It‘s the height of summer in the Northern Hemisphere, and hackers and makers everywhere are letting their hair down and enjoying the hot weather on the water. By coincidence last weekend there were two very different raft races in the European hackspace community, at the SHACamp2017 gathering in the Netherlands the villages competed in a cardboard raft race, while on the other side of the English Channel the various hackspaces in and around

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Complete IR Control

What can you do with an IR remote? How about anything? Maybe not. We‘ll settle for issuing arbitrary commands and controlling tasks on our computer. The first step in [Fungus]‘s hack is straightforward: buy an IR receiver for a buck, plug it into an Arduino, and load up some IR-decoding code. If you haven‘t done this before, you owe it to yourself to take some time now. Old IR remotes are very useful, and dead simple, to integra

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Hackaday Links: August 13, 2017

We found the most boring man on the Internet! HTTP Status Code 418 I‘m a teapot was introducedas an April Fools Joke in 1998. Everyone had a good laugh, and some frameworks even implemented it. Now, the most boring man on the Internet and chairman of the IETF HTTP working group is trying to get 418 removed from Nodeand Go. There is an argument to removing code 418 from pieces of software it gums up the works, and given only 100 code poin

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Hackaday Prize Entry: Robo-Dog Learns to Heel

[Radu Motisan] is working on a small rover whose primary trick is being able to identify its owner. Robo-Dog is his proof of concept, a rover that uses five ultrasonic sensors to move toward the nearest obstruction. Obviously, this isn‘t the same as being able to recognize one person from another, but it‘s a start. The sensors were home-built using ultrasonic capsules soldered into a custom board, with the tube-shaped enclosures made

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Reverse Engineering A BLE Service To Control A Light Bulb

So, you buy an Internet of Things light bulb, it‘s a fun toy that allows you to bathe your environment in pretty colours at the touch of an app, but eventually you want more. You start to wonder how you might do more with it, and begin to investigate its inner workings. Then to your horror you discover that far from having bought a device with a convenient API for you to use, it has an impenetrable closed protocol that defies easy access. T

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Another Arduino Compatible? This Time, It‘s A Sony

When it comes to microcontroller development boards, we have a plethora of choices at our disposal. Each has its strengths and weaknesses, be they associated with its support and community, its interface capabilities, or its choice of processor family.Most boards you‘ll find in our communities come from niche manufacturers, or at least from manufacturers who started as such. Just occasionally though along comes one whose manufacturer you wi

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Visual Development with XOD

Early programmers had to represent code using binary, octal, or hex numbers. This gave way quickly to representing programs as text to be assembled, compiled, or interpreted by the computer. Even today, this remains the most common way to program, but there have been attempts to develop more visual ways to create programs graphically. If you program microcontrollers like the Arduino, you should check out XOD and see how you like visually creating

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WiFi Deauthentication VS WiFi Jamming: What is the difference?

Terminology is something that gets us all mixed up at some point. [Seytonic] does a great job of explaining the difference between WiFi jammers and deauthenticatorsin the video embedded below. A lot of you will already know the difference however it is useful to point out the difference since so many people call deauth devices WiFi Jammers. In their YouTube video they go on to explain that jammers basically throw out a load of noise on all WiFi c

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Radio MDZhB

If you have a shortwave receiver, tune it to 4625 kHz. You‘ll hear something that on the surface sounds strange, but the reality is even stranger still. According to the BBC, the radio station broadcasts from two locations inside Russia and has since 1982 but no one claims ownership of the station, known as MDZhB. According to the BBC: [For 35 years, MDZhB] has been broadcasting a dull, monotonous tone. Every few seconds it‘s joined

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Manually-Adjustable Three-Axis Gimbal

[Tim Good] built a 3-axis gimbal out of 3D-printed and machined pieces, and the resulting design is pretty sweet, with a nice black-on-black look. He machined the flat pieces because they were too long to be printed in his 3D-printer. The various axes swivel on four bearings each, and each ring features a manual locking mechanism made out of steel stainless pins that immobilize each axis. The gimbal operation itself appears to be manual. That sai

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Simple Step-Climbing Robot Climbs Like It‘s On Mars

[Navin Khambhala] is a master at making simple what most would expect to be a complex build. Now he‘s done it again with a remote controlled robot that can easily climb steps and role over rough terrain. The parts count is small and many of them are commonly available. The suspension that makes it all possible is the rocker-bogie. It‘s the same suspension we‘ve all seen used by the various rovers ambling around on Mars. The whol

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Hackaday Prize Best Product Finalist: Reconfigurable Robots

Reconfigurable robots have been around for ages. One of the first and most popular reconfigurable robots came out of the MIT Media Lab, and last year, DTTO, a modular snake-like robot, won the 2016Hackaday Prize. There‘s a lot that can be learned from a robot that can turn from a walker to a swimmer to something that clambers over rough terrain, and [Salvador]‘s EMME does just that. It‘s a 3D printed robot and controller that&ls

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Wooden Domino Laying Machine

[Matthias Wandel] has come up with another awesome machine, this time a machine that sets up neat rows of dominos. If you‘ve followed [Matthias]‘s work over the years then you‘ll know that this is a wooden version of one hemade out of LEGO back in 2009. In true [Matthias] fashion he uses just the one motor both for moving the machine along and for pushing the dominos in place. Not satisfied with that efficient use of parts, the

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FLEX Pager Protocol in Depth

We love pager hacks. One of our earliest head-slappers was completely reverse-engineering a restaurant pager‘s protocol, only to find out that it was industry-standard POCSAG. Doh! [Jelmer] apparently scratches the same itch, but in the Netherlands where the FLEX protocol is more common. In addition to walking us through all of the details of the FLEX system, he bought a FLEX pager, gutted it, and soldered on an ATMega328 board and an ESP82

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3DP Enigma Keyboard Improves on the Original

[Asciimation], who previously created an Enigma Machine wristwatch,decided to go all-in and make a 3D-printed Enigma machine. Not a perfect replica, but rather an improved version that works the same but doesn‘t concern itself with historical accuracy. For instance, the current step involves building the keyboard. Rather than trying to re-create the spring-and-pin method of the original, he simply swapped in readily available, double-throw

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