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Fake Your ID Photos the 3D Way

Photographs for identification purposes have strict requirements. Lighting, expression, and framing are all controlled to enable authorities to quickly and effectively use them to identify individuals reliably. But what if you created an entirely fake photograph from scratch? That‘s exactly what [Raphael Fabre] set out to do. With today‘s 3D modelling tools, human faces can be created in extreme detail. Using these, [Raphael] set out

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Spice Up Your Shop with a VW Pickup Wall Decoration

Seeing a half car is always a disconcerting experience. Especially when that half car is about 14 feet up in the air. [PanasonicModelRC6015] We‘ll call him [RC6015] for short has gone and mounted 1/2 (actually more like 1/4) of a VW Rabbit Caddy pickup MK1 up on his shop wall. The caddy started life as a regular 1983 VW pickup. Unfortunately, the years had not been kind to it. The body panels were in good shape, but there were serious rus

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Heathkit‘s New RF Meter: Who is it for?

Electronic hackers and ham radio operators of a certain age have a soft spot for the Heathkit brand. Maybe that‘s why we had a rush of nostalgia when we saw the Heathkit site had a new product. You may recall that Heathkit had gone the way of the dodo until a few years ago when the brand started to resurface. Their latest kit is a precision RF meter which is available on preorder. Before there were websites and hacker spaces and all the mod

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EV3DEV Lego Linux Updated

The ev3dev Linux distribution got an update this month. The distribution targets the Lego EV3 which is a CPU Lego provides to drive their Mindstorm robots. The new release includes the most recent kernel and updates from Debian 8.8. It also contains tools needed for some Wi-Fi dongles and other updates. If you haven‘t seen ev3dev before, it is quite simply Linux that boots on the EV3 hardware using an SD card. You don‘t have to reflas

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Nominal Lumber Sizes Land Home Depot And Menards In Hot Water

Hard times indeed must have fallen upon the lawyers of the American mid-west, for news reaches us of a possible class-action lawsuit filed in Chicago that stretches the bounds of what people in more gainful employment might consider actionable. It seems our legal eagles have a concern over the insufficient dimensions of their wood, and this in turn has caused them to apply for a class action against Home Depot and Menardswith respect to their use

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Getting Data Off Proprietary Glucometers Gets a Little Easier

Glucometers (which measure glucose levels in blood) are medical devices familiar to diabetics, and notorious for being proprietary. Gentoo Linux developer [Flameeyes] has some good news about hisopen source tool to read and export data from a growing variety of glucometers. For [Flameeyes], the process started four years ago when he needed to send his glucometer readings to his doctor and ended up writing his own tool. Previously it was for Linux

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Autonomous Transatlantic Seafaring

[Andy Osusky]‘s project submission for the Hackaday Prize is to build an autonomous sailboat to cross the Atlantic Ocean. [Andy]‘s boat will conform to the Microtransat Challenge - a transatlantic race for autonomous boats. In order to stick to the rules of the challenge, [Andy]‘s boat can only have a maximum length of 2.5 meters, and it has to hit the target point across the ocean within 25 kilometers. The main framework of the

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Catastrophic Forgetting: Learning‘s Effect on Machine Minds

What if every time you learned something new, you forgot a little ofwhat you knew before? That sort of overwriting doesn‘t happen in the human brain, but it does in artificial neural networks. It‘s appropriatelycalled catastrophic forgetting. So why are neural networks so successfuldespite this? How does this affect the future of things like self-drivingcars? Just what limit does this put on what neural networks will be able to do, an

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Simple Electric Bike Conversion from 3D-Printed Parts

Challenge: Perform an electric conversion on a bicycle. Problem: No significant metal working skills or equipment. Solution: 3D print everything needed to electrify the bike. At least that‘s the approach that [Tom Stanton] took to his electric bike build. Having caught the electric locomotion bug on a recent longboard build, [Tom] undertook the upgrade of a cheap fixie, or fixed-gear bike. His deltaprinter was big enough for the motor mount

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Go Small, Get Big: The Hack that Revolutionized Bioscience

Few people outside the field know just how big bioscience can get. The public tends to think of fields like physics and astronomy, with their huge particle accelerators and massive telescopes, as the natural expressions of big science. But for decades, biology has been getting bigger, especially in the pharmaceutical industry. Specialized labs built around the automation equipment that enables modern pharmaceutical research would dazzle even the

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A Minority Report Arduino-Based Hand Controller

Movies love to show technology they can‘t really build yet. Even in 2001: A SpaceOddessy (released in 1968), for example, the computer screens were actually projected film. The tablet they used to watch the news looks like something you could pick up at Best Buy this afternoon. [CircuitDigest] saw Iron Man and that inspired him to see if he could control his PC through gestures as they do on that film and so many others (including Minority

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Teaching STEAM With Fidget Spinners

A huge focus of the maker revolution has been a focus on STEAM education, or rather an education in science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics. We‘ve seen innumerable kits and tools designed to introduce children to STEAM apps, ranging from electronic Lego blocks to robotics kits built around interlocking plastic bricks. These are just a passing fad, but finally, we have what looks like a winner: a STEAM education fidget spinner

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Interfacing a Retro Controller using the USBASP

An ISP dongle is a very common piece of equipment on a maker‘s bench. However, its potential as a hackable device is generally overlooked. The USBASP has an ATmeg8L at its heart and [Robson] decided that this humble USB device could be used as an interface between his PC and a SNES Joypad. A SNES controller required three pinsto communicate with a host: clock, data and latch. In his hack, [Robson] connects the controller to the ISP interfac

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Adding a Riving Knife for Table Saw Safety

What in the world is a riving knife? Just the one thing that might save you from a very bad day in the shop. But if your table saw doesn‘t come with one, fret not with a little wherewithal you can add a riving knife to almost any table saw. For those who have never experienced kickback on a table saw, we can assure you that at a minimum it will set your heart pounding. At the worst, it will suck your hand into the spinning blade and send y

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Building A K9 Toy

[James West] has a young Doctor Who fan in the house and wanted to build something that could be played with without worrying about it being bumped and scratched. So, instead of creating a replica, [James] built a simple remote controlled K9 toy for his young fan. K9 was a companion of the fourth Doctor (played by Tom Baker) in the classic Doctor Who series. He also appeared in several spin-offs. A robotic dog with the infinite knowledge of the T

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Self Driving Potato Hits the Road

Potatoes deserve to roam the earth, so [Marek Baczynski] created the first self-driving potato, ushering in a new era of potato rights. Potato batteries have been around forever. Anyone who‘s played Portal2 knows that with a copper and zinc electrode, you can get a bit of current out of a potato. Tubershave been powering clocks for decades in science classrooms around the world. It‘s time for something revolutionary. [Marek] knew tha

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Hackaday Prize Entry: Elephant AI

[Neik K. Sheridan]‘s Automated Elephant Detection System was a semi-finalist in last year‘s Hackaday Prize. Encouraged by his close finish, [Neil] is back at it with a refreshed and updatedElephant AI project. The purpose of Elephant AI is to help humans and elephants coexist by eliminating contact between the two species. What this amounts to is an AI that can herd elephants. For this year‘s project, [Neil] did away with the RF

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Amazing Motion-Capture of Bendy Things

Have you, dear reader, ever needed to plot the positionofa swimmingpool noodlein 3D and in real time? Of course you have, and today, you‘re in luck! I‘ve compiled together a solution that‘s sure to give you the jumpstart on solving this problem-you-never-knew-you-had. Ok, there‘s a bit of a story behind this one. Back in my good-ol‘ undergrad days, I got the chance to play with tethered underwater robots. I remember

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Converting a Robotic Motor For Lego Blocks

The Internet has brought a lot of advantage to life, not the least of which is access to really cheap electronic parts. [KarelK166] was buying cheap geared motors for projects, but they didn‘t easily work with Lego blocks. He found an easy way to adapt them and-lucky for us-decided to share. The process is pretty simple. The gearbox has two screws and an elastic band holding it together. Once the gears are exposed, you can drill a hole in t

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Ask Hackaday: SawStop - Bastion of Safety or Patent Troll

At first glance, SawStop seems like a hacker‘s dream. A garage tinkerer comes up with a great idea, builds a product around it, and the world becomes a better place. As time has gone on, other companies have introduced similar products. Recently, SawStop successfully stopped Bosch from importing saws equipped with their Reaxx safety system into the USA. This not only impacts sales of new saws, but parts for existing equipment. Who gets scre

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Detecting Mobile Phone Transmissions With a Sound Card

Anyone who had a cheap set of computer speakers in the early 2000s has heard it - the rhythmic dit-da-dit-dit of a GSM phone pinging a cell tower once an hour or so. [153armstrong] has a write up on how to capture this on your computer. It‘s incredibly simple to do - simply plug in a set of headphone to the sound card‘s microphone jack, leave a mobile phone nearby, hit record, and wait. The headphone wire acts as an antenna, and when

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Hacked Sea Scooter Lives Another Day

The Seadoo GTI Sea Scooter is a simple conveyance, consisting of a DC motor and a big prop in a waterproof casing. By grabbing on and firing the motor, it can be used to propel oneself underwater. However, [ReSearchITEng] had problems with their unit, and did what hackers do best - cracked it open to solve the problem. Investigation seemed to suggest there were issues with the logic of the motor controller. The original circuit had a single FET,

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Decoding NRSC-5 with SDR to Get In Your Car

NRSC-5 is a high-definition radio standard, used primarily in the United States. It allows for digital and analog transmissions to share the original FM bandwidth allocations. Theori are a cybersecurity research startup in the US, and have set out to build a receiver that can capture and decode these signals for research purposes, and documented it online. Their research began on the NRSC website, where the NRSC-5 standard is documented, however

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The Silence of the Fans

The good thing about using a server-grade machine as your desktop is having raw computing power at your fingertips. The downside is living next to a machine that sounds like a fleet of quadcopters taking off. Luckily, loud server fans can be replaced with quieter units if you know what you‘re doing. Servers are a breed apart from desktop-grade machines, and are designed around the fact that they‘ll be installed in some kind of control

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