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Escape Tunnel In Your Living Room: A Different Take On The Infinity Mirror

Most infinity mirrors are just minor variations on the same old recipe. Take a frame, add a normal mirror in the back, a one-way mirror on the front, and put some LEDs between them. [Stevens Workshop] took a slightly different approach and built an escape tunnel coffee table that really read more

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The Cost of Moving Atoms in Space; Unpacking the Dubious Claims of a 10 Quintillion Space Asteroid

The rest of the media were reporting on an asteroid named 16 Psyche last month worth 10 quintillion. Oddly enough they reported in July 2019 and again in February 2018 that the same asteroid was worth 700 quintillion, so it seems the space rock market is similar to cryptocurrency in read more

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Full 8-Bit Computer on Breadboards

Getting into a big electronics project often involves the use of specialized tools, namely the use of some sort of soldering iron or other way to apply solder to often intricate, tiny, and heat-sensitive parts. While it‘s best to learn to pick up this skill at some point, it‘s not read more

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Booting a PC from Vinyl for a Warmer, Richer OS

If you‘ve scrolled through the list of boot options offered on any PC‘s BIOS, it reads like a history of storage technology. Up top we have the options to boot from disk, often a solid-state drive, then USB disk, optical drive, removable media, and down the bottom there‘s usually an read more

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The Most Annoying Among Us Tasks Created In Real Life

Among Us is a hit game of deception and intrigue. Those who have played it know the frustration of trying to complete some of the intentionally difficult tasks onboard the Skeld.[Zach Freedman] decided to recreate some of these in real life. [Zach] built what are arguably the three most read more

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Hackaday Links: November 22, 2020

Remember DSRC? If the initialism doesn‘t ring a bell, don‘t worry Dedicated Short-Range Communications, a radio service intended to let cars in traffic talk to each other, never really caught on. Back in 1999, when the Federal Communications Commission set aside 75 MHz of spectrum in the 5.9-GHz band, read more

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Espressif Leaks ESP32-C3: A WiFi SoC That‘s RISC-V and is ESP8266 Pin-Compatible

Six years on from the emergence of the Espressif ESP8266 we might believe that the focus had shifted to the newer dual-core ESP32. But here comes a twist in the form of the newly-revealed ESP32-C3. It‘s a WiFi SoC that despite its ESP32 name contains a RISC-V core in place read more

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DOOM Running on the Nintendo Game & Watch

Today the newly-released Nintendo Game Watch can play DOOM. Sure, there are caveatsthis is a watered down version due to the restraints of the hardware itself. But the important thing is that this shows the hardware has been fully owned. This is code written to replace the firmware that read more

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Artistic Robot Has Paints, Will Travel

Creativity is a very human trait, and one that many try to emulate with robots. Some focus on the cerebral side of things, working with neural networks and machine learning to produce new artistic output. Others work on the mechanical side, building bots that can manipulate tools in the real read more

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Blue Pill as a Nerdy Swiss Army Knife

Not everyone can afford an oscilloscope, and some of us can‘t find a USB logic analyzer half the time. But we can usually get our hands on a microcontroller kit, which can be turned into a makeshift instrument if given the appropriate code. A perfect example is buck50 developed by read more

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RGB Party Bike Flashes With The Beat

One of the biggest dangers to a cyclist is not being seen at night. To counteract this, all manner of lighting and reflective gear is available to help ensure bicycles are seen on the streets. Of course, you don‘t have to stop at the purely practical. [TechnoChic] decided to have read more

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Intel‘s Forgotten 1970s Dual Core Processor

Can you remember when you received your first computer or device containing a CPU with more than one main processing core on the die? We‘re guessing for many of you it was probably some time around 2005, and it‘s likely that processor would have been in the Intel Core Duo read more

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Beer Pong Difficulty Level: 10

Beer pong is a fun enough game for those of a certain age, but one thing that it lacks is a way of cranking up the difficulty setting independent of the amount of beer one has consumed. At least, that was the idea [Ty] had when he came up with read more

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A Computer In The Game Of Life

We often hear the term Turing-complete without giving much thought as to what the implications might be. Technically Microsoft PowerPoint, Portal 2, and Magic: the Gathering all are Turing-complete, what of it? Yet, each time someone embarks on an incredible quest of perseverance and creates a computer in one of read more

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A Rocket Powered Ejection Seat For Model Aircraft

As radio control planes don‘t typically have human pilots onboard, the idea of installing an ejection seat in one is somewhat frivolous. But that doesn‘t mean it wouldn‘t be a lot of fun, and [James Whomsley] has set his mind to achieving the task. The build process is an iterative read more

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Among Us Emergency Meeting Button Becomes Reality

Among Ushas been an indie gaming success story. A game built by a small team has, after several years on the market, become a worldwide sensation. Gameplay consists of players attempting to find the imposter amongst their ranks and an Emergency Meeting can be called if players need to read more

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High-Speed Spectrometer Built with Cheap Linear CCD

If you‘ve ever dreamed of building a proper spectrometer, it looks like the ESPROS epc901 CCD sensor is absolutely worth your attention. It‘s fast, sensitive, easy to interface with, and at just 24 USD, it won‘t break the bank. There‘s only one problem: implementing it in your project means either read more

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Why You Need to Finish

Mike and I were talking about an interesting smart-glasses hack on the podcast. This was one of those projects where, even if you don‘t need a pair of glasses with LEDs on them to help you navigate around, you just couldn‘t help but marvel at a lot of the little read more

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Reduce, Reuse, Injection Mold

Many people have the means now to create little plastic objects thanks to 3D printing. However, injection molding is far less common. Another uncommon tech is plastic recycling, although we do occasionally see people converting waste plastic into filament. [Manuel] wants to solve both of those problems and created an read more

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Reverse Engineering a PokeWalker

The PokeWalker is part of Nintendo‘s long quest to get children (and likely some adults) walking and exercising. There‘s the PokeWalker, Pokemon Pikachu, PokeBall Plus, Pokemon Pikachu 2, Pokemon mini, and of course Pokemon Go. Despite being out a decade, there wasn‘t a ROM dump for the device and there read more

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Big Nerf Bazooka Packs a Wallop

Nerf blasters are a fun toy, often confiscated from children once they hit one too many precious ornaments around the home in the midst of battle. [Ivan Miranda] is bigger than most children however, and set about building a much larger blaster. The bazooka-like design uses a several meters of read more

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Procedurally Generated Trees

As the leaves fall from the trees here in the Northern Hemisphere, we are greeted with a clear view of the branches and limbs that make up the skeleton of the tree. [Nicolas McDonald] made a simple observation while looking at trees, that the sum of the cross-sectional area is read more

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A Motorized Rotary Shop Table from Scratch

As we‘ve seen over the years, it‘s possible to bootstrap your own metalworking shop using little more than a pile of scrap steel, a welder, and an angle grinder. With time and dedication, you can build increasingly complex shop tools until you‘ve got yourself a nice little post-apocalyptic workshop. It‘s read more

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