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One More Day for Hackaday Prize Glory

This is your last day to enter the 2017 Hackaday Prize. The theme is to Build Something that Matters, so don‘t sit on the sidelines. You have great power to make a change in the world. Put your mind to a problem you believe is worth solving and inspire us with your build. Whether it‘s a turnkey solution or a seed idea that inspires those around you, let‘swork on making the world a little bit better place. Get your entry for Anyt

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Encryption For The Most Meager Of Devices

It seems that new stories of insecure-by-design IoT devices surface weekly, as the uneasy boundary is explored between the appliance and the Internet-connected computer. Manufacturers like shifting physical items rather than software patches, and firmware developers may not always be from the frontline of Internet security. An interesting aside on the security of IoT traffic comes from [boz], who has taken a look at encryption of very low data ra

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Get Down to the Die Level with this Internal Chip Repair

Usually, repairing a device entails replacing a defective IC with a new one. But if you‘ve got young eyes and haven‘t had caffeine in a week, you can also repair a defective chip package rather than replaceit. There‘s no description of the incident that resulted in the pins of the QFP chip being ablated, but it looks like a physical insult like a tool dropped on the pins. [rasminoj]‘s repair consisted of carefully grinding

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MIDI And A Real Vox Humana Come To A Century-Old Melodeon

A hundred years or more of consumer-level recorded music have moved us to a position in which most of us unconsciously consider music to be a recorded rather than live experience. Over a century ago this was not the case, and instead of a hi-fi or other device, many households would have had some form of musical instrument for their own entertainment. The more expensive ones could become significant status symbols, and there was a thriving indust

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Space Technology and Audio Tape to Store Art

[Blaine Murphy] has set out to store an archive of visual art on cassette tape. To do so he encodes images via Slow-Scan Television (SSTV), an analogue technology from the late 50s which encodes images in for radio transmission. If you are thinking space race‘ you are spot on, the first images of the far side of the moon reached us via SSTV and were transmitted by the soviet Luna 3 spacecraft. Encoding images with 5os technology is only one

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Semi-Automatic Rail Gun is a Laptop Killer

It‘s huge, it‘s unwieldy, and it takes 45 seconds to shoot all three rounds in its magazine. But it‘s a legitimate semi-automatic railgun, and it‘s pretty awesome. Yes, it has its limits, but every new technology does, especially totally home-brew builds like this.The aptly named [NSA_listbot] has been putting a lot of work into his railgun, and this is but the most recent product of an iterative design cycle. The principl

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3D-Printed Kwikset Keys Parametrically

Good ol‘ Kwikset-standard locks were introduced in 1946 and enjoyed a decades-long security by obscurity. The technology still stands today as a ubiquitous and fairly minimal level of security. It‘s the simplest of the various standards (e.g., Master, Schlage, etc.) with a mere five pins with values ranging from 1 (not cut down hardly at all) to 7 (cut deeply). This relative simplicity made the Kwikset the ideal platform for [Dave Ped

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