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Flush Out Car Thieves with a Key Fob Jammer Locator

We all do it park our cars, thumb the lock button on the key fob, and trust that our ride will be there when we get back. But there could be evildoers lurking in that parking lot, preventing you from locking up by using a powerful RF jammer. If you want to be sure your car is safe, you might want to scan the lot with a Raspberry Pi and SDR jammer range finder. Inspired by a recent post featuring a simple jammer detector, [mikeh69] decide to buil

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Slimline Nixie Clocks

Everyone needs to build a Nixie clock at some point. It‘s a fantastic learning opportunity; not only do you get to play around with high voltages and tooobs,but there‘s also the joy of sourcing obsolete components and figuring out the mechanical side of electronic design as well. [wouterdevinck] recently took up the challenge of building a Nixie clock. Instead of building a clock with a huge base, garish RGB LEDs, and other unnecessar

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Three Thumbs, Way, Way Up!

At least one in their lives or several times a day everyone has wished they had a third hand to help them with a given task. Adding a mechanical extra arm to one‘s outfit is a big step, so it might make sense to smart small, and first add an extra thumb to your hand. This is not a prosthetic in the traditional sense, but a wearable human augmentation envisioned by [Dani Clode], a master‘s student at London‘s Royal College of A

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Hey NASA, Do You Want Your Stuff Back?

What would you do if you found hidden away artifacts of aerospace technology from the Apollo era? You call NASA. Two hulking computers likely necessitating the use of a crane to move them and hundreds of tape reels were discovered in the basement of a former IBM engineer by their heir and a scrap dealer cleaning out the deceased‘s home. Labels are scarce, and those that are marked are mostly from the late 1960s through the mid 1970s, incl

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Irising Chicken Coop Door

What‘s cooler than a door that irises open and closed? Not much. They add a nice science-fictiony detail to any entryway. [Zposner]‘s dad wanted an automatic door for his chicken coop, so [zposner] took some time and came up with a nice door for him with an iris mechanism. You‘ll need to watch the video. [Zposner] used a combination of laser cutting and a CNC router to cut the pieces, then sanded and painted the wood. After asse

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The Sound of (Synthesized) Music

What‘s an ADSR envelope generator? If you are a big music hacker, you probably know. If you are like the rest of us, you might need to read [Mich‘s] post to find out that it is an attack-decay-sustain-release (ADSR) envelope generator. Still confused? It is a circuit used in music synthesis. You can see a demo of the device in the video below. Before the Altair-which was sort of the first hobbyist computer you could actually buy-elect

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Using 3D Printing To Speed Up Conventional Manufacturing

3D printers, is there anything they can‘t do? Of course, and to many across the world, they‘re little more than glorified keychain factories. Despite this, there‘s yet another great application for 3D printers - they can be used to add speed and flexibility to traditional manufacturing operations. A key feature of many manufacturing processes is the use of fixtures and jigs to hold parts during machining and assembly operations.

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