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Intel Discontinues Joule, Galileo, And Edison Product Lines

Sometimes the end of a product‘s production run is surrounded by publicity, a mix of a party atmosphere celebrating its impact either good or bad, and perhaps a tinge of regret at its passing. Think of the last rear-engined Volkswagens rolling off their South American production lines for an example. Then again, there are the products that die with a whimper, their passing marked only by a barely visible press release in an obscure corner o

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Better LEDs through DMA

While regular Hackaday readers already know how to blink a LED with a microcontroller and have moved onto slightly more challenging projects such as solving the Navier-Strokes equations in 6502 assembly, that doesn‘t mean there‘s not space for newbies. [Rik] has published a great tutorial on abusing DMA for blinkierglowy things. Why would anyone want to learn about DMA techniques? For blinkier glowy things, of course. This tutorial as

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Voice Shifting with a Cyclone V FPGA

Cornell Students [Sean Carroll], [Gulnar Mirza], and [James Talmage] designed arealtime pitch shifterto run on their DE1-SoC and controlled by its ARM core. The team‘s goals wereto pitch-shift the left and right outputs independently, to produce chords using the original voices as well as the pitch-shifted ones, andtime-delayed pitch shifting. All of it is controlled on a VGA monitor through a simple GUI, allowing users to create lots of di

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Btrfs for the Pi

File systems are one of those things that typical end users don‘t think much about. Apparently, [seaQueue] isn‘t a typical enduser. He‘s posted some instructions on how to run an alternate file system-btrfs-on the Raspberry Pi. The right file system can make a big difference when it comes to performance and maintainability of any system that deals with storage. Linux, including most OSs for the Raspberry Pi, uses one of the EXT

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