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Stupid Copyright: MLB Shuts Down Twitter Account Of Guy Who Shared Cool MLB Gifs

Another day, another story of copyright gone stupid. This time it involves Major League Baseball, which is no stranger to stupid copyright arguments. Going back fifteen years, we wrote about Major League Baseball claiming that other websites couldn‘t even describe professional baseball games. There was a legal fight over this and MLB lost. A decade ago, MLB was shutting down fan pages for doing crazy things like "using a logo" of their fav

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In Trying To Ban Telegram, Russia Breaks The Internet

Russia‘s war on encryption and privacy has reached an entirely new level of ridiculous. We‘ve noted for a while how Putin‘s government has been escalating its war on encrypted services and VPNs in the misguided hope of keeping citizens from dodging government surveillance. But things escalated dramatically when the Russian government demanded that encrypted messaging app Telegram hand over its encryption keys to the FSB. After

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Inverting The Expected Order Of Things, German Court Orders Facebook To Reinstate ‘Offensive‘ Content

Germany‘s ridiculous hate speech law continues to wreak havoc in the stupidest ways possible. Giving social media companies 24 hours to remove poorly-defined "offensive" content has resulted in proactive removals targeting anything marginally questionable. Official complaints aren‘t much better. Government demands for removal have been no less idiotic than proactive deletions by Facebook and Twitter. It‘s a bad law. The only

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Apple‘s Internal Memo Warning Employees Not To Leak To The Press Leaks To The Press

Whatever the actual numbers, it seems like some hefty percentage of technology news revolves around leaks of one kind or another. Whether it concerns government, corporate, or legal proceedings information leaking to the public, it happens enough that at this point the operating posture of any organization should probably be to expect leaks, rather than flailing at modernity and trying to stop them. Hell, if the White House can‘t keep what

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The Music Industry Now Wants To Creep Past Site-Blocking Into App-Blocking

With site-blocking now fully en vogue in much of the world as the preferred draconian solution to copyright infringement, one point we‘ve made over and over again is that even this extreme measure has no hope of fully satisfying the entertainment industries. Once thought something of a nuclear option, the full censorship of websites will now serve as a mere stepping stone to the censorship of all kinds of other platforms that might sometim

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Techdirt Podcast Episode 163: Teaching The Law Via Podcasts

Law isn‘t simple, and truly learning about it takes more than a few short primers or even an in-depth guide or two - which makes it the perfect topic to explore via the medium of podcasts. This week, we‘ve got a pair of guests who are doing exactly that: Ken White of Popehat fame, who recently launched the Make No Law podcast about First Amendment issues, and Elizabeth Joh, co-host of the What Trump Can Teach Us About Constitution

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How Government Pressure Has Turned Transparency Reports From Free Speech Celebrations To Censorship Celebrations

For many years now, various internet companies have released Transparency Reports. The practice was started by Google years back (oddly, Google itself fails me in finding its original trasnparency report). Soon many other internet companies followed suit, and, while it took them a while, the telcos eventually joined in as well. Google‘s own Transparency Report site lists out a bunch of other companies that now issue such reports: We&l

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Daily Deal: Daily Deal: Virtual Training Company Subscription

Keep your skills sharp and stay up to date on new developments with the 89 Virtual Training Company Unlimited Single User Subscription. With courses covering everything from MCSE certification training to animation, graphic design and page layout, you‘ll have unlimited access to the entire catalog. They have over 1,000 courses, add more each week, and each course comes with a certificate of completion. Note: The Techdirt Deals Store i

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If Trump Is So Worried About Protecting Attorney-Client Privilege, He Should End The NSA‘s Bulk Surveillance (And CPB Device Seizures)

Over the weekend Trump tweeted: Attorney Client privilege is now a thing of the past. I have many (too many!) lawyers and they are probably wondering when their offices, and even homes, are going to be raided with everything, including their phones and computers, taken. All lawyers are deflated and concerned! - Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 15, 2018 If you can‘t read that it says: Attorney Client privilege is now a

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19-Year-Old Canadian Facing Criminal Charges For Downloading Publicly-Accessible Documents

A 19-year-old Canadian is being criminally-charged for accessing a website. The Nova Scotian government‘s Freedom of Information portal (FOIPOP) served up documents it shouldn‘t have and now prosecutors are thinking about adding charges on top of the ten-year sentence the teen could already be facing. (via Databreaches.net) Journalists first spotted the problem April 5th, when the FOI portal was taken offline. The Internal Services

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Comcast To Sell Netflix Subscriptions In False Belief This Will Slow Cord Cutting

As we‘ve noted previously, Comcast has enjoyed a little more resilience to the cord cutting threat than satellite TV and telco TV providers--thanks to its growing monopoly over broadband. As DSL users frustrated by lagging telco upgrades switch to cable to get faster speeds, they‘re often forced to sign up for cable and TV bundles they may not want (since standalone broadband is often priced prohibitively by intent). Of course that d

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UK High Court Hands Win To Claimant In Right To Be Forgotten Case

The UK High Court has handed down a win (and a loss) in the Right to be Forgotten column. Two plaintiffs seeking delisting of information about their past criminal exploits had their cases considered by the court. Only one of them is walking away with a court order for delisting. The other one will apparently have to live with his past. The claimant who lost, referred to only as NT1 for legal reasons, was convicted of conspiracy to account fal

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Bad News For ‘Privacy Shield‘: As Expected, EU‘s Top Court Will Examine Legality Of Sending Personal Data To US

Last October, Techdirt wrote about an important decision by the Irish High Court in a case concerning data transfers from the EU to the US. The original complaint was brought by Max Schrems in the wake of revelations by Edward Snowden back in 2013 that the NSA had routine access to user information held by companies like Facebook. As the post explained, the judge found that there were important legal issues that could only be answered by the EU&

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MPAA Apparently Silently Shut Down Its Legal Movies Search Engine

In 2015, with much fanfare, the MPAA released its own search engine of sorts as WhereToWatch.com. The idea behind the site was to combat the argument that people pirate films because there are too few legal alternatives. The MPAA built the site to show where those legal alternatives do in fact exist. Left unaddressed, of course, were questions about how useful and convenient those alternatives were, how users had to navigate through a myriad of

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