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The Public-Shaming Pandemic

Around the world, people who accidentally spread the coronavirus must face both a dangerous illness and an onslaught of online condemnation, D. T. Max writes.

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Slide Show: New Yorker Cartoons September 28, 2020

New cartoons from the magazine.

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Briefly Noted Book Reviews

‘The Erratics,‘ ‘Deep Delta Justice,‘ ‘A Country for Dying,‘ and ‘Owed.‘

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The Race to Redesign Sugar

Forget artificial sweeteners. Researchers are now developing new forms of real sugar, to deliver sweetness with fewer calories. But tricking our biology is no easy feat, Nicola Twilley writes.

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A New Rabbi Schleps Through the Village to Meet Her Flock

Shvitzing in a tallis and a leopard-print mask, Diana Fersko does her Shabbat Walk, greeting the faithful on stoops and in lobbies, Micah Hauser writes.

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The L.A. Philharmonic‘s Emotional Return to an Empty Hollywood Bowl

In a new video series, the members of the orchestra play together for the first time since lockdown began, Alex Ross writes.

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Cartoon Caption Contest

Submit your caption.

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Two Hundred Thousand Americans Are Dead

Druv Khullar writes on the state of America‘s response to the coronavirus pandemic upon reaching the tragic milestone of two hundred thousand U.S. deaths from COVID-19.

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Watching ‘Watchmen‘ as a Descendant of the Tulsa Race Massacre

Victor Luckerson writes about the descendants of William Danforth Williams, a real-life survivor of the Tulsa race riots whose mother owned the historic Williams Dreamland Theatre, and whose family history inspired aspects of characters in the HBO science-fiction series ‘Watchmen.‘

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Trump Says Supreme Court Nominee Will Be Woman, Person, Camera, or TV

Andy Borowitz jokes that, after the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Donald Trump plans to nominate a woman, person, camera, or TV to the Supreme Court-alluding to the list of words that the President boasted he could remember easily in a cognitive test.

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Meet the Stars of the Newest TikTok Collab House

Naomi Fry and Jason Adam Katzenstein humorously imagine the content-creator members of the newest TikTok collaboration house.

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Why a Never Trumper Changed Her Mind

Isaac Chotiner speaks with Danielle Pletka, a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, about her concerns about a Biden Administration, whether Donald Trump represents the Republican Party, and how she looks back on her time working with Senator Jesse Helms.

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The Cryptic Crossword: No.84

A free, online cryptic crossword puzzle from the New Yorker‘s archive, with answers and clues that exhibit the wit and intelligence of the magazine.

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The Tragedy of the West Coast Wildfires

The disasterencapsulates a moment in which both science and the everyday rhythms of American life seem to be under assault, Amy Davidson Sorkin writes.

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Running a Virtual School on Chicago‘s West Side

Peter Slevin writes about Oscar DePriest Elementary, on Chicago‘s West Side, which is adapting to virtual learning during the coronavirus pandemic.

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Sunday Reading: The World of Alex Ross

From The New Yorker‘s archive: a selection of features and criticism by Alex Ross.

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John Cleese Discusses Creativity, Political Correctness, Monty Python, and Artichokes

Michael Schulman interviews the English comedian John Cleese about artistic inspiration, cultural appropriation, tabloid journalism, and unappealing vegetables.

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For Mitch McConnell, Keeping His Senate Majority Matters More Than the Supreme Court

Jane Mayer writes about how Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell‘s drive to push a Supreme Court nomination, after the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, to a floor vote so close to the November election may conflict with his perhaps stronger desire to retain his hold on the Senate.

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‘Ratched,‘ Reviewed: A Confused, Caricaturish Origin Story for the ‘Cuckoo‘s Nest‘ Villainess

Rachel Syme writes about the Netflix series ‘Ratched,‘ which tells the origin story of the nurse Mildred Ratched, the antagonist in Ken Kesey‘s 1962 novel ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo‘s Nest‘ and Milos Forman‘s 1975 screen adaptation.

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Can Trump and McConnell Push Through a Successor to Ruth Bader Ginsburg?

Jeffrey Toobin writes about the death of the Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and about the coming fight between Mitch McConnell and Democrats over the vacancy on the Court.

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The Republicans Are Planning a Shameless Supreme Court Heist to Fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg‘s Seat

John Cassidy writes about the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the strategies that President Donald Trump and Senator Mitch McConnell may use to push a conservative nominee onto the Supreme Court before Election Day.

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Moving Back Out of Your Parents‘ Home: Orientation Materials

Eddie Small humorously imagines orientation materials for millennials who moved back in with their parents during the coronavirus pandemic but now have to move out again.

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The Private Georgia Immigration-Detention Facility at the Center of a Whistle-Blower‘s Complaint

Jonathan Blitzer writes about a whistle-blower complaint that alleges medical mistreatment of detainees at a private immigration-detention facility in Georgia.

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The Clear Night Sky Over India and China‘s Hostile Border

Raghu Karnad and Anmol Tikoo write about the area of Ladakh near the disputed border between India and China that has become a place of collaboration in the science of astronomy.

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